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Thread: Oil issues: Dry Sump, Accusump for road racing?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Doowop's Avatar
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    Oil issues: Dry Sump, Accusump for road racing?

    Well, after a discussion on Chad's thread, I thought of starting a specific thread on the need for a dry sump in a 818R in full road race conditions.

    It seems that the suby motor has oil issues in racing conditions. Blown motors seems to be a common occurrence. SO the question is what can be done to resolve the issue. The way I see it, there are 2 major solutions:

    1- install a full dry sump system as Chad and Brando, and others, are doing. If performing as it should, this is the ultimate solution. The issues I see are the price, around $3500 when all set and done, and adding more weight, requiring more space and adding more potential maintenance issues.
    2- Accusump. I think an accusump could also be a solution if added to other parts like a killer B pan, pickup and baffle, upgraded oil pump and an oil cooler. cost would be about $1400

    I know that some people probably think that they don't wanna take a chance and aim for the dry sump as the solution, but I'd like to see what other people think about doing. Not everybody as an extra $3500 laying around, and if a $1400 solution would work fine, it would be worth looking into.

    Please don't just throw answers like, "racing is expensive", or "dry sump is the only way to go", without having actual argument for it, it doesn't help much.

    Also, what is FFR doing on the blue or red Rs?
    Last edited by Doowop; 08-25-2014 at 12:09 AM.

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    Senior Member DodgyTim's Avatar
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    This thread is of interest to me too, I've bought the killer B pan, pickup and windage tray, and am wondering how far more i need to go
    there is a thread on NASIOC
    http://www.iwsti.com/forums/2-5-lite...-accusump.html
    but like most of these it is more opinion than experience
    A couple of interesting items -
    Even a dry sump needs to scavenge the heads if using on long high G turns
    Subaru's pump larger volumes of oil than other similar capacity engines, so an Accusump may not have adequate capacity?

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    You can get larger Accusumps or even pair two.

    What does Porsche do? It's a flat motor, too, and suffers the same layout issue, collecting oil in the outside head on long sweeping turns. That would indicate at least one way the problem has been addressed. The Formula V racers were pretty limited to stock parts, it would be interesting to see what they did.

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    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DodgyTim View Post
    This thread is of interest to me too, I've bought the killer B pan, pickup and windage tray, and am wondering how far more i need to go
    there is a thread on NASIOC
    http://www.iwsti.com/forums/2-5-lite...-accusump.html
    but like most of these it is more opinion than experience
    A couple of interesting items -
    Even a dry sump needs to scavenge the heads if using on long high G turns



    Subaru's pump larger volumes of oil than other similar capacity engines, so an Accusump may not have adequate capacity?

    With the dry sump, there is alot of extra oil. When the heads fill with oil, it will fill back into the tank via the breather hoses. There is alot of oil in that tank to overcome the long high speed sweepers.
    Thanks- Chad
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    Senior Member Doowop's Avatar
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    for people that are familiar with those motors, what are the options for upgrade on oil pump and are they any mods on the heads to improve oil flow?

  6. #6
    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doowop View Post
    for people that are familiar with those motors, what are the options for upgrade on oil pump and are they any mods on the heads to improve oil flow?
    The later oil pump is 1mm bigger. I cant remember if its 11mm or 12mm. But that will not help the problem. Oil flow is not the underlying problem, its the flat motor design. It doesn't help to put a bigger pump in or improve oil flow if the oil pickup is starving for oil.

    The only thing to do is watch and wait unfortunately.

    Also take "Killer B" posts with a grain of salt. The guy is selling his product and likes to make claims about others.
    Last edited by C.Plavan; 08-25-2014 at 12:43 PM.
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    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    I don't have enough facts yet, there are plenty of Subaru's that are on the road racing track today that are not running dry sumps and are not having issues, there are plenty of Subaru's that are on the road racing track today that have had engine failures. My challenge car does not pull enough G's to worry about a dry sump, it runs fine, in talking to John George it seems that the 818 pulls more G's than the challenge car. My current position is to run the car next season w/o any dry sump or whatever and when I get to the stage that I'm comfortable with he performance and that G's may be an issue then I will look into a system. It's just too early for me decide, it may also be too late.
    Tony Nadalin
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    Can the Subaru oil flow be approximated? In other words, how long (or how many RPM) will the 3 quart Accusump supply oil continuously?

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    Senior Member DodgyTim's Avatar
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    Again taken from the net, so to be confirmed.....

    Subaru oil flow rate is about 50 litres per minute = 0.83 litres per second
    Accusump at 3 quarts is about 2.8 litres

    So the Accusump (if fully charged) could provide about 2.8/0.83 = 3.3 seconds worth of oil,

    I believe they only fill slowly, so as to not rob you of oil when they are recharging, so back to back high G turns may really reduce how much oil is available

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    818 builder metalmaker12's Avatar
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    If your going to race the 818 you will need a dry sump system and an awic!
    Why: if you can't get similar airflow as the stock wrx gets to the IC than an awic is needed
    If you road race a flat engine with no dry sump that pulls over 1.0 g's you will toast your motor due to oil starvation, it is a common thing with the cars that pull the higher g's with no setup. The 818 pulls serious g's guys.
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    Senior Member DodgyTim's Avatar
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    Can we get some feedback from FFR on this? I assume at this point they have the most racing experience with the UTCC, do they see oil starvation in the blue and red cars?
    I've emailed Joe Scott asking him for details.
    Last edited by DodgyTim; 08-26-2014 at 12:06 AM.

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    I am taking the same route as Tony and also interested in more information from FFR.

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    818 builder metalmaker12's Avatar
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    As far as I know both there cars have had issues, and the current build (red 818R) is getting a cosworth longblock and all sorts of goodies. I would hope they install a dry sump and they already have an awic. But I am sure they will tell you this so you can confirm it.
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    Director of R&D, FFR Jim Schenck's Avatar
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    The blue test mule has only ever been run with a stock 2006 oil pan and pickup, we have never even opened the motor up, just pulled it from the donor and installed it and then upgraded the injectors and turbo later on. We haven't had any reliability issues with that car but that doesn't mean I would reccomend using the stock stuff on a pure track car, I wouldn't. The blue car also hasn't ever had cooling issues but it did heat soak the intercooler at Watkins Glen. We installed a turbo blanket on it and didn't have the problem at Lime Rock where our lap times held consistent throughout the session. (and it was a hotter day at Lime Rock)

    Red car has an STI pan and pickup and also has not shown any oiling issues (our data logger for oil pressure didn't show up in time for testing but we were filming the oil pressure gage during runs). The issue with the red car really was that we ran out of time and had to go with a 175k mile Legacy GT engine that blew a head gasket when we put 23lbs of boost to it (not a surprise to anyone I'm sure, but we were hoping we could get one fast lap out of it).

    Having run the cars like that but knowing what the issues are with road racing the Subie motors I still think for anyone running full aero and race tires a dry sump is the way to go, and that is what we are doing to the red car now. Phil at Element Tuning is building us a longblock and one of his dry sumps that we will be running on the car at a couple events before we prep the car for the Sema show.

    For a part time track day car I think an accusump would still be a good idea, but I would keep a close eye on the oil pressure gage for the first few laps at any new track. Some tracks are just harder on the oiling system than others with long high G corners that don't give the oil time to get down to the pan.
    Jim Schenck
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Doowop's Avatar
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    it also add the question of dry sump stages. They seem to be a lot of discussion about that on race motors on what stage is needed. the additional stages are the extra pickup points as I understand, so the kits some will be using is a 2 stage?

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    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmaker12 View Post
    If you road race a flat engine with no dry sump that pulls over 1.0 g's you will toast your motor due to oil starvation, it is a common thing with the cars that pull the higher g's with no setup. The 818 pulls serious g's guys.
    There are race cars like the Formula Vs that are flat engines that don't run a dry sump that pull more G's than the 818 ever could. So I still need more track/engine data, I just can't go off a generic statement, it may wind up being that the 818 will require a dry sump system and if so I will put one in (even though my family will not have new cloths for months) but my wife and daughter will want hard facts on why I need this $4000 unit.

    Also when it comes to dry sump it's the whole system that has to be looked at, as you have to find a tank and location for the tank that does not allow air to get into the system. Dry sumps may solve the oil starvation but they also add complexity and can produce other engine failures.
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    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    You can lead a horse to water, but you cant make them drink.
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    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C.Plavan View Post
    You can lead a horse to water, but you cant make them drink.
    Smart horses know when the water is tainted and thus don't drink or will ask for a analysis of the water before they drink
    Last edited by FFRSpec72; 08-26-2014 at 11:07 AM.
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    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFRSpec72 View Post
    Smart horses know when the water is tainted and thus don't drink or will ask for a analysis of the water before they drink
    Some FV classes allow dry sumps now, not all- it depends on the racing organization. FST they are allowed. The FV's pull around 1.2g's (no aero). FST pull around 1.6g's. John George was running the 818R at 1.5+ G's.

    I have family friends that run FV's. They are not allowed to run dry sumps in their class and they have issues not running them. The lose pressure on high speed and banked corners. They try baffling ect. However, they rebuild their motors all the time. They are cheap and easy to build VW motors, unlike our motors.

    If you or anyone else choose to ignore the fact the Element tuning blew up 3 motors on a race track, made his own dry sump system out of a bunch of available parts and has not blew a motor since, that is your choice. Heck, Brandon had issues with his that led to a toasted motor after one real track day. Nothing "Tainted" about that.

    Brandon, myself, and now Jim at FFR have decided to go with the Element Tuning dry sump kit.

    It's expensive, I get it. Originally, I did not want to buy one and was mad I had to buy one for insurance.

    I'm not going to argue about dry sumps any more. It's your money. Spend it how you seem fit.
    Last edited by C.Plavan; 08-26-2014 at 03:08 PM.
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    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C.Plavan View Post
    If you or anyone else choose to ignore the fact the Element tuning blew up 3 motors on a race track, made his own dry sump system out of a bunch of available parts and has not blew a motor since, that is your choice. Heck, Brandon had issues with his that led to a toasted motor after one real track day. Nothing "Tainted" about that.
    I'm not ignoring or saying that I will not install one or that one is not needed, but the fact that some one had issues and thus a dry sump is needed is not enough for me to run out and buy one. I know a lot of Subaru's on the track that pull over 1 G and they don't have a dry sump system and have no bottom end issues. You have to account for type of track, driver ability, etc. What worries me also is that I look at some of these dry sump units and they are not complete or fully thought out, I know some folks that installed a dry sump, and still toasted bottom end due to improper tanks/line issue and was drawing air.

    I'll let you all sort out the dry sump issues first and get my car setup and tested and then revisit this issue if the data points to needing a dry sump.
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    Senior Member Doowop's Avatar
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    Can Anybody from FFR tell us what they ran into? Jim, or Wayne?

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    Director of R&D, FFR Jim Schenck's Avatar
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    I might have rambled on a bit in that post but my basic summary is we haven't had any oiling issues running stock pans but I still highly suggest a dry sump for a full aero/racing tire car, and at least an accusump for an often tracked dual purpose car. Just good insurance for a well documented problem in the really fast race Subies.
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    818 builder metalmaker12's Avatar
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    The data will be presented by FFR and hopefully by then you have not blown your engine.
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    Senior Member RM1SepEx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Schenck View Post
    I might have rambled on a bit in that post but my basic summary is we haven't had any oiling issues running stock pans but I still highly suggest a dry sump for a full aero/racing tire car, and at least an accusump for an often tracked dual purpose car. Just good insurance for a well documented problem in the really fast race Subies.
    Note: They have run 06+ pans... the earlier WRX pans have too much sump area and much higher oil starvation risk! To play it safe, for autocross and above an early STI or 06+ pan and pickup are highly rec.
    Dan

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  25. #25
    Director of R&D, FFR Jim Schenck's Avatar
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    The other big benefit to the dry sump is clearance on the diffuser. The curved floor leading up to the diffuser has to be cut out around the pan, but not on a shallow dry sump pan. The
    Grimmspeed exhaust we put on the red car clears the floor so with the shallow pan we will have a perfectly smooth transition to the diffuser and hopefully be able to run less wing angle for lower total drag with more downforce.
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    Senior Member Doowop's Avatar
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    Chad, Brandon, would you guys mind sharing your research on what you found out there, and why you decide to go with this setup vs another one. I am looking into this and I'd rather not have to do all that work again if you have already done it. Thanks

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    Senior Member Rasmus's Avatar
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    I'm new to the dry sump world. Would installing a 5-stage dry sump oil pump be overkill for the EJ? 1 stage for pressure, 2 to scavenge from the crankcase/pan, 1 to scavenge from the left head, 1 to scavenge from the right head. Or is that just over doing it? Is running 2 stages to cavities that will mostly suck air okay? Most of the time the left and right heads won't have much oil to scavenge. But if you get to a long sweeper with sticky tires and start pulling over 1 G, you can fill up the whole head with oil.

    What do the racing flat-6 Porsches do? Or are they mounted transversely?

    Or is just running a 3-stage dry sump oil pump fine? 1 stage for pressure and 2 to scavenge from the crankcase/pan.
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    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    Should add a discussion about oil coolers also, are they really needed as I get mixed views, some folks don't have one and others have generic extrernal ones from auto parts store.
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  29. #29
    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Dry Sump info-

    I'm removing the PCV setup on my motor venting to my dry sump oil tank. I will then Tee that to the valve cover breathers, Tee again and go to the "vent in" on the dry sump tank. The 2 port scavenge will make plenty of vacuum in the block.

    For future reference on how to fill the dry sump, follow these steps:

    Pour one quart into the pan via the oil fill neck. Take the scavenge hoses off and fill those lines, add some to the pump itself if you have straight up fittings.

    After you fill the tank you'll want to crack the fitting that goes to the oem oil pump to bleed out the air until oil comes out (not running the motor).


    As for oil coolers- YES. I will be running a Setrab with a fan pack for an oil cooler.

    Over on the Subi boards, I cant understand why people think that 240 - 250 oil temps are OK...... Then half of them don't even have a gauge to even know their oil temp.

    http://www.kartek.com/Media/Images/L...gleFanPack.jpg

    or

    http://www.kartek.com/Media/Images/L..._FanPack_1.jpg
    Last edited by C.Plavan; 10-21-2014 at 04:32 PM.
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  30. #30
    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    I cant understand why people think that 240 - 250 oil temps are OK...... Then half of them don't even have a gauge to even know their oil temp.
    I guess I have to learn more as that is normal temp for the challenge car after 30 min race
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  31. #31
    Sgt.Gator's Avatar
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    Hi Tony,
    The Ridge>Carousel was the first time I've had oil pressure alarms in my LGT Wagon. That thing is crazy long at 1.1G! I have an STI pan, but I will be putting a Cosworth Baffle and Killer B pan+pickup on it this winter.

    Regarding oil coolers, I'd have to say yes, it should be planned in any racing Subaru. I've run my car with and without, with was much better. My latest mod is a NACA in the front bumper feeding the oil cooler in the stock battery location. At The Ridge, oil temps were 220-230 even after a solid hour of endurance racing. And the water temps were even better. I did a lot of work ducting and sealing around the FMIC and Radiator which paid off, water temps in the 180s throughout the race!

    ...

    Now my last heat issue is the transmission, it was 230+, spiking to 246. I'm guessing because the center VLSD was working hard and generating a lot of heat. Since our 818s won't have the center VLSD it probably won't be an issue, but it's worth running a temp sensor on it to monitor just in case. With the mid engine mounting we don't know yet how the trans will be effected by heat and lack of airflow. My temp sensor was located on the trans cooler line. Yes, I had a separate trans cooler with a pump and cooler and still get trans temps alarms. I'm saying "was" because I just swapped in a 6 speed. I'm going to try the 6 speed without the trans cooler system, but I am monitoring the temps with the sensor screwed into the oil pump line on the 6 speed.
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  32. #32
    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFRSpec72 View Post
    I guess I have to learn more as that is normal temp for the challenge car after 30 min race
    Wow, thats hot for only 30 min- around 220 is the magic oil number.

    Since the early Porsche's are oil cooled, maybe I'm more sensitive to oil temps. At least you have a gauge to tell you what it is.
    Thanks- Chad
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    Senior Member Rasmus's Avatar
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    Plavan, since you're from the Porsche world how do the dry sump Porsche guy's deal with oil pooling up in the heads from long, High G, corners? Do they run extra pump stages to evacuate the oil that pools up there?
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  34. #34
    Tazio Nuvolari wannabe Scargo's Avatar
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    Chris (KillerB) says that a dry sump setup for the Subaru motor needs four scavenging pumps. One for each head. If you go external oil pump then you have the ultimate in adjustability of oil pressure, but I'm not sure that too much should be made of that. Supposedly I know someone who can make the stock oil pump's pressure easily adjustable.

    Chris has also said "I wouldn't waste any money on an Accusump. It offers false hope as it doesn't provide nearly enough flow or pressure to prevent damage. Plus there is a pressure drop when pressure does come back to 'recharge' the system even when the engine is still under severe load. You'd be better off fixing what's causing the problem.
    You'll like the 818. We've got quite a few guys running our pan in them The handle amazingly well and consistently pull 1.7Gs, which is more than essentially what the fastest open class T/A Subies are doing on far less budget! So far data logging is showing our pans are still supplying a good oil supply at those levels."
    I consider Chris a pretty knowledgeable guy when it comes to Subies. However, I feel my two quart Accusump has been valuable in long, high-G sweepers. If it's a placebo for me, then fine. My motor/oil system has not failed me.
    "Scotty, give me all the TRACTION she's got!" Pictures of what I drive till 818R is finished

  35. #35
    Senior Member FFRSpec72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scargo View Post
    Chris (KillerB) says that a dry sump setup for the Subaru motor needs four scavenging pumps..
    He does not come out and say you need a dry sump, is that because Killer-B makes the pan and not the sump ?
    Tony Nadalin
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  36. #36
    Tazio Nuvolari wannabe Scargo's Avatar
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    He (Chris at KB) thinks dry sump is the ultimate solution if you have a racer that's pulling high Gs. Obviously, with slicks, a well setup/well driven 818 is capable of high Gs.
    I'm really on the fence as to dry sump or KB stuff and Accusump with my 818 build. Big difference in money and complexity.

    In addition, in 2015 KillerB has come out with a control valve which mitigates oil migration out of the engine through the head breathers. This keeps oil in the engine but does not stop oil surge to the heads. It's a good addition for a pure track car if you don't go dry sump. Perhaps best for a street Subaru rather than an 818. In an 818 you have cheaper, simpler solutions with the use of a draining A/OS which you can position high over the engine. An open drain-back A/OS is what I use on my track STi. A catch-can after that collects about three ounces of thin oil~fuel liquid per hour. My STi can do 1 to 1.3 G's on banked turns and spikes to 1.5 with significant banking.
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    Last edited by Scargo; 10-29-2017 at 07:06 AM. Reason: 5-30-15, added comment about KB valve. 10-29-17, added G data and clarifications.
    "Scotty, give me all the TRACTION she's got!" Pictures of what I drive till 818R is finished

  37. #37
    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasmus View Post
    Plavan, since you're from the Porsche world how do the dry sump Porsche guy's deal with oil pooling up in the heads from long, High G, corners? Do they run extra pump stages to evacuate the oil that pools up there?
    Doh! Sorry Rasmus. I posted it earlier, but for some reason its not there. Lets try this again.

    The early Porsches (non water cooled) do not have any way to scavenge out of the heads- There are 2 ports on the oil pumps. Only the GT3 models have a way to scavenge out of the heads with additional ports. (Interesting fact- I can buy a new GT3 Cup car oil pump and put it in my in 1967 case to have the additional port to make it scavenge. It would fit in the case just fine, dimensions and all.)

    So with the Porsches, it does pool up in the heads, but the early Porsches came with a dry sump system from the factory- OEM. Stock early air cooled Porsches hold around 8 qts of oil. My race car with a modified oil tank and front cooler holds close to 14 qts.

    So once you fill the head up, there is still plenty of oil in the system. There are no PCV valves on the race cars, it vents to a tank with a breather on it. I made sure the hose to the breather tank, from the crank case goes up hill. I never have any oil in it, just usually condensation. I think I emptied it once in 10 years.




    Boy its dirty...... I need to clean it.


    I have never had an issue on high banked turns, with sustained loads. I'm talking 10 years plus, never an issue.




    Looking at the Dry Sump I bought, it is similar in the fact that you can fill the head, and still have ample supply of oil (Due to additional oil tank) to overcome the pooling in the head. In fact, the head breathers connect back to the oil tank. So if you push enough into the head and it goes up the breather hose, you essentially are filling the oil tank back up to go back in the motor.

    There are no head vents/breathers on Porsche motors, so this is new to me. Just a big crankcase breather is on my 911 that goes to the breather tank I mentioned earlier.

    On my 818R Oil tank, I will be adding a sight glass on the side so I can glance and see how much oil is in the system since you loose your dipstick. I plan on throwing a Gopro pointing at the oil tank sight glass to see how much is being sucked into the system under accelerating/cornering/braking. The total oil in this dry sump ~8qts.

    As for Killerbee stuff- I bought it all, but I do not think ~5qts of oil will last long on the tracks I see. So it all came off. I really don't believe the claims, especially for an 818.
    I mean, who has a running 818 on the track that is not broken????? Since he has "Alot" of customers running them on their 818's, I want to hear from them asap. Keep in mind he sells stuff.... Its really nice looking stuff, but It wont work for me and others.

    Another thing on what he said. Cars do not "need" scavenging ports for the head. Though it is nice, early Porsche motors have been doing it for YEARS and have an extensive race history. As long as your oil pump is not sucking air, you solved the problem. I do agree with him Chris on the Accusump "false hope"- A Subaru oil pump flows 49.7 qts/min @5000 RPM....Just do the math- how long does a Subi motor suck in 2 qts from the Accusump? I know of alot of corners longer than that!

    I will also be running an oil cooler as previously stated. One with a "Fan Pack" to throw air over the cooler. I do not run thermostats on the external oil coolers, never have, and never will on a race car. It's just one more thing to break. I always warm them up good before going crazy on the track (remember I have 14 qts in the Porsche lol)

    I'm hoping by putting this all together, my car last longer that one track day..... At least that is my goal! If the motor goes, I'm going to drop a Porsche 3.0L in it.

    Sorry about the rambling- I'm sure you guys know alot of this already.
    Last edited by C.Plavan; 10-22-2014 at 09:44 PM.
    Thanks- Chad
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  38. #38
    Senior Member Rasmus's Avatar
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    Thanks, man.

    Just a 3 stage oil pump then. 1 stage for pressure and 2 to scavenge from the crankcase dry sump. Though a 5 stage could work; one doesn't need to go that route. It's alright to fill the heads up with oil, as long as the oil tank still has oil to pump into the motor. I'd imagine the heads will get so full of oil that eventually the level gets right back to the dry sump scavenge ports bolted to the bottom of the crankcase. Even at 1.5+ g's. There's only so much room to fill with oil.

    On the head PCV ports. When I go dry sump I'd just block those off. Why even bother with the extra plumbing? There's still the main crankcase port on the top of the right case half I could hook up to high mounted breather tank.
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  39. #39
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    Chad, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Element Tuning dry sump pump only a 2-stage set up for scavenging? I thought their system relied upon the OEM oil pump for the pressure side (seem to recall Phil once saying that they never had trouble with the pressure itself, it was starvation that killed his engines). Maybe I'm thinking of another system...?

    And fwiw, at the flow rate you cited, just about every carousel corner that I frequent lasts longer than a 2-qt. Accusump system could cover. I'm up at Road America way too much to even consider it...you're in the Carousel there for 12-15 seconds depending on the speed you can carry. Can you say "boom!" for me?

    Best,
    -j
    "Weight transfer is the enemy."

  40. #40
    Senior Member C.Plavan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santiago View Post
    Chad, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the Element Tuning dry sump pump only a 2-stage set up for scavenging? I thought their system relied upon the OEM oil pump for the pressure side (seem to recall Phil once saying that they never had trouble with the pressure itself, it was starvation that killed his engines). Maybe I'm thinking of another system...?

    And fwiw, at the flow rate you cited, just about every carousel corner that I frequent lasts longer than a 2-qt. Accusump system could cover. I'm up at Road America way too much to even consider it...you're in the Carousel there for 12-15 seconds depending on the speed you can carry. Can you say "boom!" for me?

    Best,
    -j
    Yes- 2 stage scavenge and OEM pump for pressure. Here is a picture of the pump that goes where the A/C was.



    Oil flow specs-
    Here is the Subaru page from their workshop manual:
    Thanks- Chad
    818R-SOLD!!!- Go Karted 7/20/14/ Officially raced NASA ST2- 2/28/15
    2016 Elan NP01 Prototype Racecar Chassis #20
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