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Thread: Al C's MK4 Coyote Build

  1. #81

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    If I hadn't taken this path I would always wonder "what if..." . It's a learning experience that's worth every minute!
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  2. #82

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    I like this time of year. There is less going on so I get to spend more time working on the car. You’ll recall from a recent update that I needed to move the expansion tank and power steering reservoir and I fabricated some new brackets. I more or less finished that little job this past weekend.

    I had done the cutting and drilling on the brackets a few weeks ago, but hadn’t dealt with the frame. Initially, I drilled 3/16 pilot holes, in the hopes that rivets would suffice. My local “advisors” said, nope, drill and tap them. Easier said than done. But, now I have a new skill! If there had been no engine in the way, this would have been a piece of cake. If I had (hmmm – maybe I should get one of these!) a 90 degree drill, it would have been easier (or at least straighter). But, I got through it. Everything would have lined up perfectly if I had drilled everything in place, but the “in place” drilling was the pilot holes. The larger, tap-specific holes were done separately and ended up being less than perfectly perpendicular. Whatever. I just drilled the brackets one size bigger and everything fit fine. Here’s what it looks like from up top:



    I used aluminum that I cut out of the center of the Breeze radiator shroud, which is significantly heavier than the kit aluminum we know and love. Nevertheless, once I tightened the piece down, I noticed it bent to fit the contour of the X frame and tends to wiggle a bit. I think I want to reinforce that with some angle aluminum (is this the best label? It certainly isn’t angle iron…) so I can make this a bit more rigid. The reservoir will be in the way so you won’t see any of that, and the vibration should be eliminated. Once that’s done, I can fix the length of the hoses and put everything back together. Of course, fixing the length of the hoses is easier said than done, but I should be able to fix all that in a couple of hours. Maybe. Maybe it will take the whole freaking day.

    On to wiring! Last time, I worked my way through the controls pack harness and pretty much have everything identified and labeled. My thinking is to identity and label the whole mess before I do any cutting or connecting. This past weekend’s project was to understand the RF harness and how to integrate it with the Coyote.
    As a side note, it’s interesting to note (at least to me) how my perspective on these things has changed. It’s all about context. I had no idea earlier this year what I was doing and naively thought I could work through the entire wiring process in a weekend. Now that I have a bit more understanding I realize how ridiculous that initial estimate was! Still on the perspective piece, what I thought was a huge undertaking or achievement doesn’t seem like such a big deal anymore. I guess I’m finally beginning to understand. I like the fact that when this is done and on the road, I’ll know that I had my fingers into everything. But I digress…

    The fuse box got installed with the RF harness months ago. It’s been dangling out of the pedal box looking rather hagged for longer than I like to think, and I’m finally dealing with it all. I laid out my FFR schematic, EdwardB’s wiring spreadsheet and the Ford instructions and set to work! My hope here is that by documenting all this I have a record of what I’m doing/have done and get feedback that maybe something could be done better. Additionally, and this is the big part – I HAVE QUESTIONS! Hopefully, you can answer them!

    There are four wires taped together (not in convolute) labeled “coil efi crank”. They are:
    • Efi crank – blue. Is this needed?
    • Coil or EFI – orange. My original assessment was get rid of this. EdwardB spreadsheet says it gets used, “details elsewhere”. According to the schematic, this is the power feed to the ignition switch. Yes? No?
    • Speed sensor green. This goes to the speedometer.
    • Speed sensor gray. Also goes to speedometer. The other ends of these two wires are connected to the transmission.

    Headlight switch bundle.
    • Plug. The connector fits into the headlight switch. This is where it goes.
    • Black wire. Ground.

    Starter Solenoid bundle.
    • Blue wire. Keep or lose? I’m thinking I don’t need this.
    • Battery feed. Connect to battery? Is this my main power supply for the RF fuse box?
    • Alternator feed. Is this another main power supply for the fuse box?
    • Do I keep the above two leads or lose them?
    • Ignition switch lead. I’m thinking no.

    Radio/Heater/Wiper bundle.
    • Red courtesy light. Connect to courtesy light.
    • Grey courtesy light. Connect to courtesy light.
    • Brown. Goes to heater.
    • Red – radio memory. Tie off and keep for possible future use.
    • Purple – wiper. Goes to wiper.
    • Grey – radio power. Tie off and keep for possible future use.

    Sending units / electric choke bundle.



    • I’m thinking I need to lose the connector and match up various sending units with these wires. Yes?
    Alternator bundle.
    • Brown – “to ignition switch”. Needed?
    • There are three red wires. Two go to the starter; one to the alternator. Do I need any of these to go anywhere? If so, how do I tell the difference?

    Inertia switch.
    • Black – ground.
    • Black to relay. That connects to the tan wire in the rear harness.
    • Take the tan wire out of the fuse box and connect it to the green wire out of the coyote pigtail (C160A).
    Ignition switch bundle. (this is going to be fun…)



    Coyote pigtail:
    • Red: HAAT
    • Yellow: key on
    • Blue: starter request
    • Green: starter

    RF:
    • Red – headlight
    • Red – battery
    • Brown – accessory
    • Brown – alternator – yes/no?
    • Orange – ignition feed – yes/no?
    • 2 blue – leave out? One is efi-crank – probably don’t need it; 1 is clutch safety switch which I’m not using.
    • The FFR instructions say connect the pigtail light green to the orange coil wire and that nothing else gets used. This conflicts with the Ford controls pack instructions. Who gets their way???

    Here is what I believe is the Hot Rod column bundle. Yes? I can lose this, right?



    OK, two more items. Any idea what this thing is? Is this for Mustang donor builds? I can’t find any connector in the harness that it mates to.



    Finally, once I know what wires I can get rid of, I want to thin things out. I know that some of you undo the whole harness and remove the wires completely. That seems like a lot of effort, and I’m wondering if it’s worth it. Can I cut them / tie them off where they exit the various convolute bundles? This applies to the A/C wires and intercooler wires on the controls pack as well… thanks for your input.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  3. #83
    edwardb's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you’re getting more comfortable with the wiring. No question the Coyote installation adds to the wiring task. But don’t let it intimidate you. Take it one step at a time. Rather than answering every single point, let me offer this explanation. (1) The Ron Francis harness is installed exactly as shown in the RF instructions for most everything. That includes all the lighting circuits, gauge circuits, heater, radio, ignition switch, etc. (2) The Coyote is installed as described in the Ford Performance and FF Coyote instructions. Important to understand is that the Coyote is basically a standalone system. There are only these interface points, and once this is understood, hopefully most of the answers are clear:

    1. Battery +12V supply to Coyote PDB

    2. +12V signal to Coyote pigtail light green when key is on to wake up the system and tell it to stay alive. Provided by the RF orange EFI/Coil wire.

    3. +12V signal to Coyote pigtail light blue when key is in start to tell it to initiate the start sequence. Provided by the RF blue EFI Crank wire.

    4. Coyote +12V fuel pump supply pigtail green grafted into RF harness. This allows the Coyote PCM and PDB to control and power the fuel pump, while utilizing the existing RF wiring to get the voltage back to the tank mounted fuel pump.

    5. RF large alternator wire to the large post on the Coyote alternator. Provides battery charging from the alternator back through the RF harness and to the battery.

    6. The 2015+ Coyote Controls Pack doesn’t have a tach connection. So it’s necessary to graft the RF harness/Speedhut tach wire into one of the Coyote coil on plug harnesses. Shown in my build thread.

    That’s it. With those basic connections, and the two systems wired per their respective instructions, it will work. Several additional points:

    1. I recommend using the cooling fan control only by the Coyote system. Hook the cooling fan wire from the Coyote harness to the radiator fan per the Ford instructions and don’t use the RF cooling fan wires or circuit for the fan.

    2. I also recommend using the start function only by the Coyote system. So the Coyote start wire goes to the small post on the starter motor. The blue RF start wire is only used for the Coyote start sense wire previously mentioned. Note this also means the RF clutch safety wiring (part of the blue RF wire circuit) is not used. The Coyote harness has its own clutch safety switch.

    3. The FF Coyote instructions show installation of the water temp and oil pressure sending units to the Coyote. Also interface points, but not mandatory to make the Coyote system work.

    4. Finally, I did use the always on wire (HAAT) in the Coyote pigtail to power the GPS speedo keep-alive wire as well as the Speedhut clock. So technically also these are interface points.

    Everything I’m describing here is in point-to-point detail in my spreadsheet you mentioned. I assume you see there are multiple tabs in the spreadsheet? Some information is in several places. So if something doesn’t appear complete, check the other tabs. I recommend you use it exactly. It works. Several other builds have followed it, and I'm happy (relieved?) to report they're also running and/or driving.

    For some of your other points, it's not mandatory to remove wires you're not using. Also not mandatory to undo the harnesses any more than necessary to get stuff to reach and be somewhat neat. Do as much as you're comfortable with. I did some, but not as much as many. I did remove the Hot Rod leg simply for space reasons. The yellow wire in the Coyote pigtail is not needed. Tie it back as described in the spreadsheet. The plug with wires you pictured is a relay socket. Probably not needed for your build unless you're adding a relay somewhere. I think that's it and hopefully helps.
    Last edited by edwardb; 11-03-2017 at 11:13 AM.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  4. #84

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    Thanks, Paul! Back at it again on Saturday and we'll see how it goes.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  5. #85

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    Once again, it’s more than 6 weeks since my last update. Why change now? It’s been busy around here.
    Related, but not really, we traveled to the Gilmore Auto museum near Kalamazoo in early November. Wedged in between a couple of other cars is this original Cobra.



    It looks an awful lot like Gumball’s car… OK, back to reality.
    When I ordered my kit, I elected to get a cut off switch.


    Master cut off, if you will. I was thinking theft-deterrent rather than racing, but I knew I’d need one if I was going to take the car on the track. (who am I kidding…) After I started going through all the Coyote documentation, I wrote the thing off, because I didn’t consider the obvious way of maintaining the HAAT lines for the engine. But, reading a number of threads, I came to the conclusion it would work and I really should install it. But where? I looked at a number of options, none of which were that great, and finally settled on the spot below the dash where many others have installed theirs. The problem was – the engine is already in! I’m not about to pull the engine again just to install the switch. Well, it’s in, and I can actually reach the connection points below the firewall. It would be easier without an engine in the way, but we’ll get past that.



    Next up is the conflict between the crossmembers on the frame and the mid-shift. Last time we discussed that topic here, I got way more input than I ever expected. To me, 2BKing had the best advice, so I went for it. It was a bit nerve-wracking to cut the frame, but I figured I had measured enough times that I should just go for it. I put a piece of plywood between the frame and the transmission and made the cut with the angle grinder.



    I used two different sized steel bars: one that is the same size as the tube, and one that fits nicely inside. Here it is before I trimmed and powder coated the backing piece:



    And here it is completed.



    Here’s the only concern I have: you’ll notice that the right side of the mid-shift is pretty close to the frame piece that I cut. When you stand at the back of the car and look forward, the transmission seems to be offset. I’m thinking that maybe I loosen things up and shift it toward the driver’s side by about ¾ of an inch. Maybe I’m just being anal. Maybe you’ll have an opinion.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  6. #86

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    On to wiring. Again. The Coyote controls pack comes with a rather long cable that has two connections at each end. This thing is designed to drop into a Mustang, so they made it basically as long as a Mustang. I don’t need all this wire. But I need the ground wire, and I needed to see where the cables were joined inside the convolute. I’m sure some of you have experienced this quirk: the ENTIRE cable is wrapped by non-adhesive tape. By the time I got the whole thing unwrapped, I had a ball of tape about the size of a baseball.



    After Thanksgiving I made my usual conference trip to Las Vegas. I had the better part of the first day in town to myself, so I made another pilgrimage to the Shelby museum just south of the strip. The tour guide was excellent. He had worked for Shelby himself many years before and had a ton of stories. He was really interesting. They also had a deal going with Exotics Racing, who have a facility at the International Speedway. They had brought a GT350 to the museum and were promoting “laps” around the industrial park for a pretty reasonable fee. I bit. It was supposed to be three laps around the block, but I ended up driving for the better part of 25 minutes. It was a blast. Who knew you could go fast dodging semis? Yes, I am an idiot...



    When I got back home I started working on the dashboard in earnest. I mounted right angle brackets on the back of the dash using countersunk rivets



    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  7. #87

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    Then I got busy with the veneer. I was a bit nervous about gluing the veneer on the dash and having everything lined up. I was also concerned about whether the countersunk rivets would show. So, I did a trial run on a piece of scrap and everything worked out well on that little experiment. Jazzman came through with some really good advice and I ran with it. I lined up the wood grain where I wanted it and applied the contact cement to both the veneer and the dash. I had planned to use dowels to keep the wood and the dash apart while lining things up. Jazzman suggested pencils. But, the guy at the wood shop where I bought my supplies suggested wax paper. That worked out really well. I hadn’t considered rolling the veneer over the bottom of the dash. I was going to cut it flush. Again, Jazzman came through and told me it wouldn’t be that hard. The best part was that it took no softening of the veneer whatsoever. It rolled much easier than I ever expected. Here are a few photos of it’s evolution, the last being with two coats of clear. I need to add one more coat before I cut out gauge and switch holes.









    Hopefully, the weather will moderate and I’ll be able to get into the garage for a longer period of time. It’s currently 3 degrees here with wind chills in the -15 range. That tends to limit the amount of time I want to spend in the garage.
    Ducky2009 made a bracket for my heater valve (his recommendation there, too).



    I’ll powder coat this and get it installed, soon, hopefully. I need to finish the power wiring and then I can work on the dash wiring and the heater. I agree that it makes more sense to finish the heater hoses behind the dash so I can see what room I have to work with.

    Maybe you noticed that I mentioned a lot of other forum members in this update. I’d be lost without you! Thanks everyone for your continuing support. There’s still lots to do. Still too many projects going on simultaneously, but what can I say!
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  8. #88
    wareaglescott's Avatar
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    Hey Al. Glad to see you back at it. Good work.
    It is normal for the transmission to be biased towards the passenger side like that. It is supposed to be like that. Looks good to me.
    Look forward to the next update Feb 16! Hahaha. Just messing with ya. Hope you and the family had a great holiday.
    MK4 #8900 - complete kit - Coyote, TKO600, IRS - Delivered 6/28/16 First Start 10/6/16 Go cart - 10/16/16 Build completed - 4/26/17 - 302 days to build my 302 CI Coyote Cobra - Registered and street legal 5/17/17
    Build Thread http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...e-build-thread
    PHIL 4:13 INSTAGRAM - @scottscobra

  9. #89
    Jazzman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_C View Post
    Your Veneer work looks to have come out great. I like the fine grained wood. Just a couple of thoughts. Looking at the photo above. It may just be an optical illusion, but it looks like the veneer might not be fully bonded to the panel above the middle of the three smaller gauge holes. Be sure it is all fully bonded before you proceed.

    My dash was made from a blank, uncut, dash panel. I used hole saws to cut the holes in the locations that I wanted. I selected appropriate hole saw sizes to make my holes just big enough for the gauges, but not sloppy. It appears you are using a stock FFR dash panel. The cutout holes in the stock panel are slightly oversized to allow for the thickness of the traditional leather/vinyl dash material to be cut and folded through the holes before the gauges are installed. If you simply cut around the inside of the existing holes to remove the veneer material, you will end up with holes that are too big for your gauges. Here is my suggestion for how you deal with this problem. From the back side of the dash, drill very small marker holes in the exact center of each of the holes. Cut out wood veneer disks the same size as each of the holes. These wood filler disks will just about fill the thickness of the aluminum dash panel. Glue the filler disks into the holes from the back side. Cut a piece of .040 aluminum large enough to cover each gauge hole and over lap the space by at least 1" all around. The five small gauges and the holes for the ignition switch and light switches should all be done with one filler panel. Using the same contact cement that you used for the veneer, glue the filler panel on the back side of the dash covering all of the holes. You are basically gluing up one large lamination of wood and aluminum. Be sure to apply solid pressure all the way around the filler plate to make sure it is thoroughly bonded to to the aluminum dash panel. Once the cement is fully dry, use appropriately sized hole saws to drill through the marker holes from the front of the dash panel and through the aluminum filler panels. (See my build thread, post #488. Hole saws used are 2" and 3.875". I use DeWalt hole saws. I bought them at Home Depot.) This should create holes in the same place as the originals, but have holes that are the right diameter to just fit your actual gauges and switches. The threads on the gauges are plenty deep to allow for this additional thickness of wood and aluminum. I hope this helps.
    Last edited by Jazzman; 12-26-2017 at 11:07 PM.
    Jazzman
    MKIV #8745 "Flip Top" Roadster Ordered 7/30/15. Tilt front, Coyote Engine, Tremec TKO600, IRS w. 3.55 final, 18" Hallibrands, dual rollbars, custom Zebrawood Dash. Delivered 11/25/15, First Start 12/24/16, First Go Cart, 1/6/17, Licensed and Legal 11/20/17. | Build Thread | Frame Dolly Plan

  10. #90


    Not a waxer
    Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_C View Post
    ...Here’s the only concern I have: you’ll notice that the right side of the mid-shift is pretty close to the frame piece that I cut. When you stand at the back of the car and look forward, the transmission seems to be offset. I’m thinking that maybe I loosen things up and shift it toward the driver’s side by about ¾ of an inch. Maybe I’m just being anal. Maybe you’ll have an opinion.
    Al,
    The entire drivetrain is offset to the passenger side by about an inch by design. What you are seeing is normal. Veneer turned out well!

    Jeff

  11. #91
    David aka Ducky2009 Ducky2009's Avatar
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    Al, the dash looks great. Be sure to post pics after installing the gauges. Love the look
    MK4 Build #9035 Delivered 2/17/17, First Start & Go-Kart 6/2/17, Licensed 9/1/17
    Paint - Lightning Blue Metallic, No Hood Scoop, No Stripes
    Coyote Engine & TKO-600. Solid Axle, 8.8-3.55, Power Brakes, Dual Roll Bars
    Heater and Glove Box, Drop Trunk, Wipers, Radio, FFR Vintage Gauges W/GPS Speedo
    Build Thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...MK4-Build-9035

  12. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzman View Post
    Your Veneer work looks to have come out great. I like the fine grained wood. Just a couple of thoughts. Looking at the photo above. It may just be an optical illusion, but it looks like the veneer might not be fully bonded to the panel above the middle of the three smaller gauge holes. Be sure it is all fully bonded before you proceed.

    My dash was made from a blank, uncut, dash panel. I used hole saws to cut the holes in the locations that I wanted. I selected appropriate hole saw sizes to make my holes just big enough for the gauges, but not sloppy. It appears you are using a stock FFR dash panel. The cutout holes in the stock panel are slightly oversized to allow for the thickness of the traditional leather/vinyl dash material to be cut and folded through the holes before the gauges are installed. If you simply cut around the inside of the existing holes to remove the veneer material, you will end up with holes that are too big for your gauges. Here is my suggestion for how you deal with this problem. From the back side of the dash, drill very small marker holes in the exact center of each of the holes. Cut out wood veneer disks the same size as each of the holes. These wood filler disks will just about fill the thickness of the aluminum dash panel. Glue the filler disks into the holes from the back side. Cut a piece of .040 aluminum large enough to cover each gauge hole and over lap the space by at least 1" all around. The five small gauges and the holes for the ignition switch and light switches should all be done with one filler panel. Using the same contact cement that you used for the veneer, glue the filler panel on the back side of the dash covering all of the holes. You are basically gluing up one large lamination of wood and aluminum. Be sure to apply solid pressure all the way around the filler plate to make sure it is thoroughly bonded to to the aluminum dash panel. Once the cement is fully dry, use appropriately sized hole saws to drill through the marker holes from the front of the dash panel and through the aluminum filler panels. (See my build thread, post #488. Hole saws used are 2" and 3.875". I use DeWalt hole saws. I bought them at Home Depot.) This should create holes in the same place as the originals, but have holes that are the right diameter to just fit your actual gauges and switches. The threads on the gauges are plenty deep to allow for this additional thickness of wood and aluminum. I hope this helps.
    Kevin, That was very astute of you to see the little bubble on the top of the dash. It isn't an illusion - it's a goof. I didn't notice that until after I had stained the piece. I've been debating whether I should try to fix it or just leave it alone. You won't see it, because the top will be under the lip of the body. But, if it will eventually pull away, then I guess I need to address it. The problem is how to fix it without creating a bigger problem. In your opinion - can I just squeeze a little contact cement into that opening and roll it out? I look forward to your thoughts there.

    On to the gauge holes. I planned for the differential in size for the tach and speedo and have o-rings that take up the slack. I tried it out earlier and they worked pretty well. Based on your comments, I'll need to check the smaller holes, but I had the gauges in the raw aluminum and don't recall there being much slop in those. I don't think the stock holes are much over 2" if they are at all. (I'm visiting Martin's build this afternoon, so I'll check his out...) If I need to, I'll see if I can find some o-rings for those too (it's just easier), but failing that I'll go the laminate route.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  13. #93
    Jazzman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_C View Post
    Kevin, That was very astute of you to see the little bubble on the top of the dash. It isn't an illusion - it's a goof. I didn't notice that until after I had stained the piece. I've been debating whether I should try to fix it or just leave it alone. You won't see it, because the top will be under the lip of the body. But, if it will eventually pull away, then I guess I need to address it. The problem is how to fix it without creating a bigger problem. In your opinion - can I just squeeze a little contact cement into that opening and roll it out? I look forward to your thoughts there.

    On to the gauge holes. I planned for the differential in size for the tach and speedo and have o-rings that take up the slack. I tried it out earlier and they worked pretty well. Based on your comments, I'll need to check the smaller holes, but I had the gauges in the raw aluminum and don't recall there being much slop in those. I don't think the stock holes are much over 2" if they are at all. (I'm visiting Martin's build this afternoon, so I'll check his out...) If I need to, I'll see if I can find some o-rings for those too (it's just easier), but failing that I'll go the laminate route.
    You are right, you likely will not see it. The only concern might be when you have to install/remove the dash, will it get caught on the body and crack away. Can't really tell, but it would be more safe if it solidly laminated to the dash panel. You might begin by just clamping that bubble between a couple of pressure pads to see if the contact cement that is there will just set up and hold it in place. If that doesn't work, a small paintbrush full of contact cement might do the trick.

    Glad to hear you are on top of the hole size differential problem. I will look forward to seeing your "O" ring solution. Please post when you can show it, as I haven't seen O rings that size. Keep up the good work!
    Jazzman
    MKIV #8745 "Flip Top" Roadster Ordered 7/30/15. Tilt front, Coyote Engine, Tremec TKO600, IRS w. 3.55 final, 18" Hallibrands, dual rollbars, custom Zebrawood Dash. Delivered 11/25/15, First Start 12/24/16, First Go Cart, 1/6/17, Licensed and Legal 11/20/17. | Build Thread | Frame Dolly Plan

  14. #94

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    The Dash is complete: January 14. This took way longer than expected, but I am pleased with the result. If I decide to do this again – or if anyone else is thinking of doing a veneer on a dashboard – don’t get a pre-cut dash! Yes, that little detail – all the holes done for me, at the factory, in advance – resulted in more “fun” for yours truly. For all my kicking and screaming, I finally took the laminate path – twice!

    Those of you who are still following along (I suspect that there are those who have thrown up their hands exclaiming ‘what is taking this guy so darn long!’) the issue was that the pre-cut holes are larger than the gauges themselves to accommodate the vinyl or leather that most people use. While that covering serves to cushion the gauge and ensure it’s nice and tight, it becomes somewhat of an issue with the veneer. More or less. Probably not, but Jazzman planted enough doubt in my mind that I bit the proverbial bullet. In the end, this route is the better one.

    Jazzman recommended I fabricate a laminate of sorts (above) to fill in the extra space and enable gauge-sized holes. The only challenging part there was finding the exact center of each hole, which – again with an assist from Kevin – turned out to be no big deal. My math teacher daughter was aghast that I couldn’t recall something this basic – I should have just let her do it. Marking the center allowed me to drill a pilot hole from the back and then cut the correct sized hole from the front of the dash. Here are the intermediate steps:





    Considering that I had one shot to get these things right, I drilled a test hole with my “existing” 2 inch hole saw to ensure everything would go as planned. I was surprised how much wobble there was with the arbor (in this case, essentially a drill bit held in place by a set screw). That resulted in a new hole saw. It worked much, much better. This is the difference between the store brand and the name brand. That’s not always the case, but this time it was true. Anal? Perhaps, but I really didn’t want to screw up the work I had already done. It was worth the 20 bucks or so it cost.

    The next challenge was the headlight switch. The pre-cut hole is ½. The locking cap for the switch has threads that are 7/16.



    In and of itself, that’s not a big deal, but there’s a locking tab on the switch which is to hold it in place when you rotate the knob. While the hole really should be 7/16 with a notch at the top, this thing will fit inside the ½ inch hole, but it will be off a bit vertically. If vinyl were in the picture, it would probably hold everything in place where it should. I decided that while I’m being anal about it, why not just move the switch? To that end, I posted another thread here: https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...-measure-handy
    The idea was to move the headlight switch to the left of the speedometer. As it turns out, the overwhelming opinion was “this is not a good idea”.

    OK, no problem. I got the whole laminate thing down now, so let’s do it for the switches, too. I made a paper template to accommodate the headlight switch (with tab), hazard switch, wiper switch, and heater switch. The two switches in the middle are standard ½ inch diameter, so they fit nicely with the pre-cut holes. The outside switches – headlight and heater – are smaller, but are centered on the same line as the center switches. I drew out the spacing for each of these – the heater switch is actually a “D” – and drilled them out. The paper template worked really well and everything came out just about perfect.





    The center switches actually hold the backing piece in place, so there was really no need to cement anything. This turned out to be far easier than trying to mess around with the dash itself and allowed me the luxury of being able to re-do it had I messed up on the first one. The backing piece has the 7/16 hole with a notch for the headlight in the right spot vertically, as well as a “D” hole for the heater switch that also fits inside the half inch hole perfectly.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  15. #95

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    Lastly, I found that using the Dremel with a cutting bit and sanding drum worked far better than a razor knife in cutting the holes out through the veneer itself. Here’s how it came out.



    You can see the bezel for the steering shaft in the photo. When all is said and done, it’s held in place by a few screws. In my mind, there isn’t that much material in the dash for those things to screw in to, so I’m thinking about making some sort of backing piece for it. That would also provide a little more strength to the area around the shaft, as the stock dash has the long oval opening there. I haven’t decided if I’ll do that in wood or metal yet.

    January 21. The snow is melting, it’s actually warm enough to work in the garage. Time to wrap up the power wiring. Or, at least try.
    I got these little details complete:
    1. Ran the battery cable from the battery in the trunk box through convolute through the trans tunnel to the cut off. Included the ground wire from the C500 connection in that bundle. The Coyote controls pack instructions insist on connecting that ground wire to the battery, which seems a bit extreme to me, but I’ve got the wire, I’ve got the room to run it, so what harm is there in actually following directions for once?
    2. Made the connections from the cut off to the PDDB and the 250A fuse.
    3. Made the connection from the cut off to the starter and connected the Coyote starter cable. Just need to anchor the cables to the frame. Still need to ground the engine to the frame, too. Between the controls pack cable, the kit battery cable, and the RF wiring, there were enough extra pieces of appropriate gauge wire that I could make everything I needed with just a little soldering and crimping.

    Little by little, I’m making progress. One of these days it will warm up and I’ll actually be able to function in the garage!

    January 28. Not much happened this weekend. Yesterday, the 27th was the 23rd annual K of C Pasta Dinner and Auction that I chair annually. We did OK this year. Not great, but OK. It’s a lot of work, but it’s important. We raise funds for people on the margins – those who have some serious medical issues but fall thru the cracks with insurance. Believe it or not, there’s a lot of people like that. We used to do it in November, but for the past 2 years had to do it in January (venue availability). I want to move it back to the fall. I think we’ll get our numbers (attendance and revenue) up by moving the date. But I digress… The issue build-wise now are little things like wiring connectors and crimpers that don’t work that great.

    February 3, 4. I finally figured out why I can’t get my 10 gauge wire into a 10 gauge connector: it’s really 8 gauge. Boy, don’t I feel better! Of course, it took 2 of us to figure that one out. Whatever. This little issue is standing between me and having my power wiring complete. I need a connector on the alternator wire, the starter solenoid wire (it’s the same one!) and the cutoff to junction block. FFR told me I’d be OK with 10 gauge for the main feed from the cutoff, but I’m happier with the 8 ga. I found the right connectors and ordered them.

    In the meantime, you may have noticed my thread here (https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...-cable-concern) about my clutch cable. The backstory here is two-fold. I sought opinions at the very outset about cable vs. hydraulic clutch and the feedback was pretty much split. Since there was no real “winner” I went with the cable because we took that approach in build school. Then I saw Bruuce’s graduation thread and it got me thinking. Bottom line: until something drastic occurs, I’m keeping my cable. The manual suggests mounting the bracket that comes mounted on the cable to the ¾ inch lower frame rail. That might be OK, but it will be outside the steering shaft and that will pull it closer to the header. Instead, I’m securing the cable to the block using one of the lift bracket holes. Here’s a photo of my home made bracket:



    I ran this idea by a couple of you and so far, I have the thumbs up. It should keep the cable safely away from the header, and it also provides a place to secure the alternator wire that goes back to the RF harness, keeping it, too, away from the heat. I call this my “ghetto bracket.”

    Yes, there is a story that goes with that name. I sell Identity and Access Management software, and a couple of our engineers came up with a creative way to store passwords for multi-factor authentication. An example of multi-factor is when you get a text message with a code to enter at the web site you’re trying to log in to. Well, we presented this method of storing passwords and solving the multi-factor problem for older applications and these guys at the customer site started calling it “ghetto MFA” because it wasn’t a “purist approach”. Maybe it wasn’t purist, but it got the job done easier and less expensively than the approach the customers wanted to take. Anyway, my bracket may not be “purist”, but it gets the job done. Ghetto bracket it is.

    Feb 11,12. Power wiring is complete. Finally. It’s amazing how easy things are when you have the right parts. I got the 8 ga. Connectors and they fit perfectly. What I struggled with for what seemed like hours last week took no time. I also swapped out the old crimper. As it turns out, the crimper I had was made for weatherpack connectors. That’s all well and good except for the fact that I’m not using weatherpack connectors. These are molex-style heat shrink connectors. The heat shrink jaws in the new crimper make this much, much easier. Lesson learned.

    Feb 17,18. More problems solved. I’m probably making things more complicated than I need to, but I’m coming to the place where I’m fine with this project being done when it gets done. Jeff Kleiner helped a lot in that regard, reminding me that this is a hobby and that I’ll probably miss the build when it’s done.

    He’s right.

    So, new approach – Let’s see how long that attitude lasts!

    Here’s the clutch cable/ghetto bracket/alternator cable all wrapped up:



    I suppose I could have chopped off a bit more on the clutch cable part itself, but I wanted to leave a little wiggle room if I needed it. It’s on now, and you’ll really have to stick your head in the engine bay to see it. I like the way everything is away from the header, but I’m a bit concerned about the engine harness plug that goes into the rear of the alternator. I think I saw something on Wareaglescott’s thread about that, but I have to go check that again. Here’s another photo:



    I need to get a nut for the alternator wire, too. Either I never got a nut on that post or I lost it. I tried another nut I had, but I think that post is fine thread and I didn’t want to force the nut I had. Anybody know what the thread count is on that post?
    I got the battery ground done, too. I put that on the inside of the large square tube near the battery box. I think this is a decent location. Here’s a photo:

    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  16. #96

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    I also got back to dealing with my power steering system. It seems like a long time ago (it was!) that I had put everything in, but then I had to move the reservoir because it would be in the way of the hood hinge. I fabricated a bracket that I bolted to the X frame, but I’ve been postponing dealing with that. A good part of that postponement was because I was unsure how I was going to route and connect everything and it was easier to put it off. Time to face the music.

    The main issue here was that when I routed the large hose (feeding the pump from the reservoir) it was too close to the lower control arm. I could shorten the hose as one way to solve that, but Mark Reynolds didn’t think that was a great idea. So in order to keep the hose out of the LCA’s way, and not interfere with anything else, I made yet another ghetto bracket. The original concept was to have that bracket mounted vertically to the ¾ inch tube, but then I had contention with the radiator overflow tank. However, by having the bracket extend horizontally, it holds the hose where I want it and keeps it away from the overflow tank, too. Here’s what it looks like, all nicely powder coated.



    Here’s what it will basically look like when it’s installed:



    The last thing I did over this weekend was get going on the trunk drop box. Here you can see the in-process stage of the box itself



    Next up is dropping the gas tank so I can get the box and trunk floor in place. I’ve been holding off on those until I had all of the rear harness wiring buttoned up. It’s much easier to access things from above than below!

    I hope to get the trunk done as well as finish the PS plumbing next weekend. And maybe I’ll find the right nut for the alternator. I had these grand plans about working on gauge wiring this weekend. Then I took a good look at the manual. Oops. The gauges in the manual are different than what I have. It looks like the instructions are centered around the Autometer gauges, and I have the vintage gauges. Time for more study before I start cutting anything.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  17. #97
    Jazzman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_C View Post
    Looks Great, Al!! Nice wood choice. Cherry? Your hard work paid off. Congratulations!!
    Jazzman
    MKIV #8745 "Flip Top" Roadster Ordered 7/30/15. Tilt front, Coyote Engine, Tremec TKO600, IRS w. 3.55 final, 18" Hallibrands, dual rollbars, custom Zebrawood Dash. Delivered 11/25/15, First Start 12/24/16, First Go Cart, 1/6/17, Licensed and Legal 11/20/17. | Build Thread | Frame Dolly Plan

  18. #98
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    Nice progress. Like the dash a lot. Cherry is one of my favorite woods. Agree with Jazzman, that's what it looks like. For the alternator nut, one didn't come with mine either. I checked my build records. All I wrote was "metric nut for alternator wire" from my local Ace hardware store. Not too much help, except that it's definitely metric and something easily available.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  19. #99

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    Thanks for the compliments on the dash! Yes, it is cherry. Now I just need to wire up the back side so I can install it!
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  20. #100
    Senior Member broku518's Avatar
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    Hi Al, the dash is looking awesome. I like the steering shaft cover. Where can I get something like this?

    Thanks,
    Martin
    Life is short, so start living it.
    Build thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...-in-the-garage!
    delivery date: 10/31/2017, first start 2/24/2018, title and registration passed 6/22/2018

  21. #101

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    Martin, The steering shaft cover is part of the Russ Thompson turn signal. Russ is one of our vendors listed here on the site: http://www.norcal-cobras.com/store/r...uss_garage.htm
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  22. #102
    Senior Member broku518's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al_C View Post
    Martin, The steering shaft cover is part of the Russ Thompson turn signal. Russ is one of our vendors listed here on the site: http://www.norcal-cobras.com/store/r...uss_garage.htm
    oh, so this is part of the turn signal assembly? I am not getting one, was just looking for some nice cover/clean look.
    Life is short, so start living it.
    Build thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...-in-the-garage!
    delivery date: 10/31/2017, first start 2/24/2018, title and registration passed 6/22/2018

  23. #103

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    OK, time for an update. As updates go, this one is not very exciting. In our last episode, we had made some progress on a number of fronts, and the prospect of a first start was on the horizon. The summary version of this update is that confidence levels are increasing, tasks are getting checked off, and the prospect of a first start is very real – before my kit’s third anniversary! (That’s in July, for those of you keeping track) On the other side of the ledger, time continues to get eaten up by all sorts of things like business travel, fun travel (see photos below), and family events. As I transition into retirement (which I discussed with my management) I expect to have more time to spend on the build. Maybe. We’ll see. So far, that hasn’t worked out so well. I’m still hitting the office every day. Back to the build.

    One of these days, (soon) I will start adding fluids. The brakes need to be bled, as does the Power Steering. I can do that now, because the power steering system is complete. At least until we discover some leak caused by the questionable threads on the bottom of the aluminum reservoir. Hopefully that is a non-issue, but we’ll reserve judgement.







    I need to get a new oil filter because the original got pretty beat up when we dropped the engine into the frame (the first time, before I removed the stock oil cooler…) I also need to get the oil into the transmission. Before I mount the cockpit aluminum. But, then again, I need to finish the e-brake routing before I do the aluminum. Everything is set up to employ the stock set up. Clearly, there is doubt in my mind, because I haven’t made the connection yet. Still debating if I should leave it as is with the stock, under the frame approach, or go the pulley/lokar route. I’m thinking pulley approach. The cables don’t reach, and I have no idea where the extension pieces are that were supposed to be with the brakes. (I have the Wilwoods) Without the extensions, the cables don’t reach. I’ll poke around in the “extra parts” box and see if I can track down the extensions, but I’ll probably spring for the lokar part and pulley anyway.



    You can see that with the extension, all would be good.

    I had started working on the RT trunk drop box last time, and was able to finish it before “the trip”. There were two things I needed to do before I wrapped up the trunk. First, I needed to run a wire through the rear harness for a backup light. It sounds simple (and probably should be), but it was a pain in the neck. I would love to get my hands on some kind of tool that spreads the convolute apart and lays a wire in it. I couldn’t find anything like that – maybe I should try to fabricate something. In any event, it’s too late now. I ran a wire back through the tubing, got that set, and then attached the rear harness to the frame. Then I could focus on installing the drop box and trunk itself.

    It was all pretty straightforward until I got the sequence wrong. I don’t think it’s a big deal now, but I was annoyed at myself for a while when it happened. Everything fit quite well, so I was ready to silicone and rivet when I realized that I needed to rivet the lower trunk floor onto the frame. At the rear. As much as I thought I had everything in the proper place at the outset, the action of riveting the floor to the rear frame members served to push the floor forward about 1/8th inch. Maybe not even that much, but it was enough to throw the drop box out of alignment with the frame and everything else. Some pushing and filing and we got things pretty much where they should be, but it wasn’t perfect as it was before. Nevertheless, this is all going to be covered by carpet so unless you had read this missive you wouldn’t even know that was an issue. Here’ a look at the before and after



    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  24. #104

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    Having the floor in place allowed me to get the rest of the rear end aluminum in place. One good thing about doing aluminum: it’s a visible sign of progress!
    I got a roll of heat tape that Wareaglescott recommended and used it on the alternator wire. There isn’t a lot of clearance here between the alternator and the shorty headers, but I think this will do the trick. From there, I ran the oil pressure and water temp sender cables and bundled them together. I taped up the water temp sender, too.



    April was a busy month. It started with a couple of days of business travel and ended with a week of business travel. In the middle was two weeks in SoCal and Hawaii. It was wonderful. A bit of a digression from the roadster, but here are a few photos:






    Look! It’s a Mk IV Roadster! No, actually, it’s a lava flow. Everybody was watching the lava pool at the top of Kilauea – it had just started erupting 90 minutes before we arrived. In my twisted mind, it was more fun to photograph all the tourists looking at the lava pool. I did manage to get a video of the lava, but I’ll spare you all here. Last one:



    You didn’t want to miss the green on this hole. Thankfully, I didn’t. OK, back to work.

    The gauges are coming along nicely. Everything is pretty much identified as to where it goes, all the sending units are connected to the engine and wires are bundled (mostly) neatly in the engine bay. Here, I haven’t really done justice to the whole dash wiring effort. I’ll cover that in more detail in the next update when I outline in detail where everything went.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

  25. #105

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    I followed EdwardB’s writeup (almost to the letter) for the tach connection and that seemed to work out pretty well. It was a little nerve-wracking to strip the spark plug wire, but it looks like everything came out pretty well.





    Next are the heater vents. I covered that topic in this thread here:
    https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...-about-heaters!
    I got some ideas there, and here’s what I ended up with on the DS.



    Getting the air hoses in place actually helps, prior to the wires. I test fit the dash in place and it seems that there’s room for everything. In fact, there’s more room than I expected.

    Speaking of the dash, I did a trial fit of the dash with the RT turn signal “tube”. Thankfully, it fits. (it did before, but you never know…) I have the Mike Everson bezel that goes on the dash around that tube, and since my dash has the veneer, there isn’t a lot of material to screw that bezel to. I decided to fabricate a backing plate, and then bolt the bezel to it. That should also provide a bit more support for the whole thing around the steering column. I made the backing piece out of 1/8 inch steel. Nothing fancy, but it fits well and will do the job. I’m still cutting these pieces with the angle grinder and Dremel tool. I missed out on the band saw I wanted to buy, but maybe one will show up for sale (at a reasonable price) again soon.



    While we’re looking at powder coated items, I need to do a plug for Eastwood. This was an example of what I consider really good customer service. You’ll notice that the wonderfully fabricated backing piece is not very glossy in appearance. It should be. The powder I used is “glossy black”. So I shot a note to Eastwood with the photo because I wanted to find out what I was doing wrong. The customer service guy (Sean) determined from my photos that it’s not me – it’s the powder. He told me that if I got him the original order number, he’d replace the powder. Kudos to Eastwood. I didn’t expect that, and am pretty happy with them!

    I got the RT steering tube bolted down in place. As noted above, I had to ensure that the dash was going to line up where it should. Just to be sure, I tried it twice before I locked down the tube in place and started drilling. While I was at it, I drilled the bottom of the frame hoop where I’ll mount the dash. It’s long enough ago that anybody reading this is not going to remember that I flush mounted right angle pieces onto the dash so I can connect them from below with no visible bolt heads on the dash face. Truth be told, this has turned out to be a bigger pain than it is probably worth, but we’ll see how it turns out once the body is on. So far so good!



    Next up:
    1. Finish dash wiring – this weekend.
    2. Cooling system
    3. Fuel connections between regulator and fuel rail
    4. Fluids
    5. Battery
    6. Start.
    Should have more time in the next few weeks, so I’m hoping for some major progress soon! (didn’t I say that last time?)
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes

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