Very Cool Parts

Visit our community sponsor

Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  3
Results 1 to 33 of 33

Thread: True cost of getting a Coyote set up and running in a MK4?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like

    True cost of getting a Coyote set up and running in a MK4?

    I've read a number of build logs, using the Coyote engine in the Roadsters and I've seen people ask questions about pros/cons, whether it's better to go with a Coyote or a SBF. (I wouldn't even consider a non-Ford engine. In my opinion, a vehicle that was historically Ford powered should stay that way). So on my parts list below, how far off am I? Are any of these parts unnecessary? From the engine to the input shaft of the transmission, am I missing anything? It's entirely possible that some of these parts can be found for less money, depending on how much hunting is done. No, the GP headers aren't strictly necessary but I think they're better than the headers that come from Factory Five and would likely use them regardless of which engine I select.

    Description Part Number Vendor Unit Price
    5.0L Coyote 435HP Crate Engine M-6007-M50A Don Woods Parts $6625.00
    Moroso Oil Pan 20570 Summit Racing $405.97
    Moroso Oil Pickup 24570 Summit Racing $104.97
    GP Stainless Steel Double Collector Headers GP Headers $1300.00
    Ford Performance Gen II Wiring Harness M-6007-504V Don Woods Parts $1448.39
    Ford Performance BOSS 302 Alternator Kit M-8600-M50BALT Tasca Parts Center $225.50
    Ford Performance Starter M-11000-C50 Buy Ford Performance $229.99
    Roadster Coyote Installation Kit 15432 Factory Five $350.00
    Quicktime Bellhousing RM-6080 Summit Racing $659.95
    Ford Performance Billet Steel Flywheel M-6375-M50 Summit Racing $289.97
    Ford Performance Clutch M-7560-T46 Summit Racing $449.97
    $12,089.71
    Last edited by charlesshoults; 02-02-2017 at 06:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member q4stix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    253
    Post Thanks / Like
    That's a pretty accurate list of parts and prices if you were to buy all the parts on any given day without looking, or waiting, for sales or used parts (engine, starter, etc.)
    Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe builder

  3. #3
    Member grluisi150's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Millersville, MD
    Posts
    71
    Post Thanks / Like
    Some other things to consider:
    bolts for clutch and flywheel,
    throw-out bearing,
    clutch fork,
    thrush bearing,
    air intake,
    fuel pump and regulator.
    engine cover

    Gary
    Mark IV base kit, 2015 Coyote, Wilwood brakes, IRS-3.55 TruTrac, T56, ABS, PS, Nitto G2, Carbon fiber Dash

  4. #4
    Mustang Convert bansheekev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Morgan Hill, CA
    Posts
    341
    Post Thanks / Like
    Add in:

    - Radiator overflow tank / additional hoses
    - Header bolts
    - SCT or other programmer + custom tune / off the shelf tune (if you decide to go that route)

    Kevin
    MKIV, IRS/TruTrack/3.55s, Coyote, TKO600, Wilwoods
    Delivered: 1/6/2012
    First Start: 1/19/2014
    First Go-Kart: 2/1/2014
    Graduation: 1/4/2015
    Graduation Thread

  5. #5
    Senior Member edwardb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lake Orion, Michigan
    Posts
    5,737
    Post Thanks / Like
    Not that I'm one to talk, but there is money to be saved with a Ford aluminum bell housing vs. the Quicktime bell. Also the nodular flywheel that comes with the engine is completely usable and most do.

    You'll also need some intake pieces. The Factory Five instructions show what's required. Couple hundred bucks there as I recall. Other than that, the list has the major items. There are additional items as others have listed.

    But my main observation is that if you're comparing the cost of a Coyote to other engine options, the things to compare would be the cost of the Coyote specific parts, like the engine, controls pack, installation kit, etc. Like you mentioned for the headers which would be required for any engine choice, same would be true for the bell housing, clutch, alternator, starter, low profile oil pan, and most of the other parts cited in other responses.

    There are tons of options for engine choices, new, donor, salvage, build your own, etc. But if a new crate motor is in the build plan, you'll have a hard time finding 435 hp with EFI, 4-bolt forged crank, aluminum block, etc., all with a 2-year warranty like the Coyote. I dug pretty deep into this analaysis before my current build. I was initially planning to do a more traditional engine. But the Coyote was the best value by quite a bit. Again, if you truly compare apples to apples.
    Last edited by edwardb; 02-02-2017 at 07:51 PM.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  6. #6
    Senior Member Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Taxachusetts
    Posts
    347
    Post Thanks / Like
    Pad that budget with about another 1K and you should be good.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    I'm focusing primarily on items that would be different between a Coyote and a small block Ford. Nuts and bolts are needed for every installation, as are cooling systems. Even with my aversions, I'm leaning toward an electric assist steering system to eliminate the pump, pulley and fluid lines. If I can identify an alternator that would be common between the Coyote and the SBF as I wouldn't consider that a Coyote specific part so I could eliminate it from my list. Same goes for the starter, but I think the two engine types use flywheels with a different tooth count. Either setup would use a chassis wiring harness so that wouldn't be unique either. I spend all of my days with computers as a system engineer and part of me thinks that computers cause more problems than they solve. That can be taken from a business, social or political perspective. Like anything, if you take care of it, maintain it regularly and address any issues you find, cars should last a lifetime, especially cars like these, where they're typically not going to be driven hundreds of thousands of miles. I'm not fond of the drive by wire throttle and I'm less fond of plastic switches. With the Coyote, is there any alternative to the electronic throttle setup? I'm fine wth using computerized systems to supplement normal mechanical operation but I don't think that systems should be built where electronics are the sole controlling interface. I'm just 40 years old but I think I was born about 30 years too late.

  8. #8
    Senior Member wareaglescott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Auburn, AL
    Posts
    1,904
    Post Thanks / Like
    Your last post sounds to me like you just made a great case why you should not use a Coyote. Build it old school if that suits your desires.
    MK4 #8900 - complete kit - Coyote, TKO600, IRS - Delivered 6/28/16 First Start 10/6/16 Go cart - 10/16/16 Build completed - 4/26/17 - 302 days to build my 302 CI Coyote Cobra - Registered and street legal 5/17/17
    Build Thread http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...e-build-thread
    PHIL 4:13 INSTAGRAM - @scottsrides

  9. #9
    Senior Member edwardb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lake Orion, Michigan
    Posts
    5,737
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by charlesshoults View Post
    With the Coyote, is there any alternative to the electronic throttle setup? I'm fine with using computerized systems to supplement normal mechanical operation but I don't think that systems should be built where electronics are the sole controlling interface.
    Short answer, no. It's kind of nice not having to mess around with a throttle cable or linkage, but that's a bit off topic. Longer answer, the Coyote engine is like most modern engines and simply will not run without the computer (PCM) controlling nearly every aspect. Including fuel, ignition, valve timing on all four cams, throttle body position, mixture, etc. Without the computer, the program it operates, a whole gaggle of sensors providing feedback, and active controls responding to the feedback, it's not going anywhere. It's how they make power, driveability, economy, and emissions control all at levels that were impossible before.

    Quote Originally Posted by wareaglescott View Post
    Your last post sounds to me like you just made a great case why you should not use a Coyote. Build it old school if that suits your desires.
    Agreed.
    Last edited by edwardb; 02-03-2017 at 01:11 PM.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dave Howard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    North Bay, Ontario
    Posts
    533
    Post Thanks / Like
    Budget for a tune on your Coyote. The stock program assumes the crate Coyote is using the air box that comes control pack, and assumes your exhaust is the stock Coyote factory header and Mustang system. A custom tune on a dyno is worth every penny.

    My experience with the Coyote is all good.
    - 490 HP - Mustang Dino
    - Great fuel economy while touring. 5 hours on a stock Mustang tank.
    - Smooth responsive operation through entire range of RPM.
    - Operates very well on 87 octane pump gas. No need for expensive 94.
    - No difference is operation between sea level and 4000m.
    - Super strong 4bolt bottom end. Bullet proof and reliable.

  11. #11
    Senior Member CraigS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Manassas, Va.
    Posts
    2,822
    Post Thanks / Like
    While I have a SBF in mine and wouldn't want a Coyote, I will add that electronics are one of the only reasons we still have gas engines in our cars. I spent 20 yrs as Lexus tech and went to school at least once per year. The advances are incredible. One year they pointed out that there was no longer a seperate egr (exhaust gas recirculation) system on the new engine. Why? W/ computers controlling both cams, they just crank in a bunch of overlap to get the egr. Their initial drive by wire throttle was electric w/ mechanical backup and next they went full electric. Guess what, that eliminated the mechanical cruise control linkage and the second throttle body blade that they used to use to reduce engine power when the traction control and/or stability control system needed less power. Remember distributers and plug wires and dist caps? All gone when an ecu can control individual coils. Now this one I didn't believe the first time I was told it but when the 3rd Lexus instructor said it was true I have to think it is. How does the ecu know when there is an engine misfire? Think about an 8 cylinder engine running. We figure the rotation is smooth right? Not true. The crank actually accelerates a little each time a cylinder fires and slows a little in between. If the speed sensor doesn't see one of these accelerations, it knows a cylinder didn't fire. Look at compression ratios in modern engines. Most all are in the 11s and some in the low 12s. On pump gas. Only possible w/ sophisticated ecus and sensors. These are just a few instances to show how electronics have changed gas engines tremendously for the better.
    FFR MkII, 408W, Tremec TKO 500, 2015 IRS, DA QA1s, Forte front bar, APE hardtop.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Misterfubar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    102
    Post Thanks / Like
    I just ordered my Coyote and the last of the parts I needed from Summit yesterday. Call them and they will price match or beat every one of those prices you have listed.

    I used this company for the price on the engine and got it for a little bit cheaper than the Don Woods price. http://www.fordracingbyspeedshopdire...-6007-m50a.htm I think Don Woods was cheaper on everything else.

    If you go the Coyote route, search out the best price on everything and have them pulled up in your browser and give Summit a call. The phone call took me about 10 minutes and saved me almost $800 off of the price of the parts that were already in my cart.

    I had a tracking number for all the items except the engine about 2 hours after I got off the phone and they'll be here tomorrow. The engine is already on a truck and will be here but Tuesday.

  13. #13
    On a roll Al_C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wheaton, IL
    Posts
    556
    Post Thanks / Like
    Charles, Just my 2 cents. I elected to go with the Coyote because I wanted new technology. That, and the fact that 400 HP was going to cost roughly the same if I went old school or new. Why do I say this? Not that it's any of my business, but I'm wondering why you're asking the question. If it's strictly a financial decision, you can arguably make a case either way. Lots of people find inexpensive ways to install a SBF, but lots of people spend way more than a Coyote, too. WareagleScott and EdwardB believe you may actually want a SBF. So all I can suggest is that you understand what's driving your decision and go with it. It's good to analyze this in detail, but in the end you should go with your gut.
    Mk IV Roadster - #8650 - delivered 7-17-2015 - first start 7-28-2018 - first go-kart 10-13-2018: a work in (slow) progress
    Complete kit / 2015 Coyote / TKO600 / IRS / Wilwood brakes / Mid-Shift mod / Power Steering / Heater and Seat Heaters / RT turn signal / Breeze radiator shroud and mount

  14. #14
    Senior Member DaleG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Prescott, AZ; formerly from the Bay Area
    Posts
    829
    Post Thanks / Like
    You might want to call Mike Forte and give him your "Coyote needs list" and see what he can do price-wise for the whole list. I had a very good response from him back in 2013 for all my Coyote components.
    SOLD 03/2013: MK II #5004: 5.0 EFI: 8.8, 3.55, E303, TW heads, GT40 intake, 24#, 70mm MAF

    Ordered MK IV Coyote Complete Kit.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    Gen3 Crate Motor is a bit more, but I think worth it!

    5.0L 460HP Mustang Crate Engine Gen 3 M-6007-M50C $7,878

    2018 Coyote 5.0L Manual Transmission Control Pack M-6017-M50B $1,672.50


    a difference of $1,477.11 or 18% more cost for 6% more power... (435HP vs 460HP)

    Last edited by toadster; 03-13-2019 at 02:51 PM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Raleigh NC USA
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    You should look to places like Summit or other FFR COYOTE packagers.

    They have a pretty complete, fuel pump, starter, alternator, belts, MOROSO pan, etc 435BHP COYOTE for $10K

    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/s...tcombocontents
    Last edited by BEAR-AvHistory; 03-13-2019 at 03:18 PM.
    Kevin
    MKIV #8234
    Coyote '13/TKO-600
    Delivered 2/7/14 - Plate "COYOTE NC1965" 3/25/15

  17. #17
    Senior Member Avalanche325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Jax Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    The only thing wrong with a Coyote is the packaging. They are physically HUGE. Besides that, they are a great engine. Price-wise, they are easily $2K - $3k more than an SBF with similar HP.

    I also work on computers all day. I wanted my Cobra to be low tech old school. It gets terrible mileage, needs to warm up, smells like gas and exhaust, is loud, snotty and high strung. PERFECT! The Coyote would be more of a turn the key and go experience. Either engine will make the car go down the road.

    The thing that I wouldn't want going either way is electric power steering. Not a fan as of yet, due to the feel or lack thereof. But, you do want power steering in my opinion.

  18. #18
    Not a waxer Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    4,186
    Post Thanks / Like
    I know this is an old thread but still relevant. I just priced out a Coyote package for a potential client build today; figure $14K for engine, trans, controls and supporting systems. Compare that to similar output from a Windsor and it's pretty much a wash.

    Jeff

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    665
    Post Thanks / Like
    I agree with you Jeff.....the difference being the Coyote has so much more usable power and better street manners then a carbureted small block.

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    211
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Avalanche325 View Post

    I also work on computers all day. I wanted my Cobra to be low tech old school. It gets terrible mileage, needs to warm up, smells like gas and exhaust, is loud, snotty and high strung. PERFECT! The Coyote would be more of a turn the key and go experience. Either engine will make the car go down the road.

    Honestly, I think that this is exactly what the choice comes down to. Do you want that old school vibe with all that entails (both positive and negative) or do you want a modern turnkey solution. I've got a '67 Mustang convertible with a 351W that nobody else in the family will ride in because you end up smelling like gas all day after you ride in it, so I went Coyote on my build, but I love both options.
    MkIV Roadster build: Coyote, IRS, TKO600. Ordered 10/24/18. Delivered 1/29/19. Build thread here.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    126
    Post Thanks / Like
    my 2 cents, when you figure in all the costs, the added complexity (electronics) and the packaging issues what real advnatage does a Coyote offer over say this:

    https://performanceparts.ford.com/part/M-6007-Z2363FT

    I mean a ford performance 363 crate motor built on the 302 Boss block puts out over 500hp and has none of the packaging concerns or the electronic complexity

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by caesarmascetti View Post

    my 2 cents, when you figure in all the costs, the added complexity (electronics) and the packaging issues what real advnatage does a Coyote offer over say this:

    https://performanceparts.ford.com/part/M-6007-Z2363FT

    I mean a ford performance 363 crate motor built on the 302 Boss block puts out over 500hp and has none of the packaging concerns or the electronic complexity

    Several of us in the 500hp / 500ftlb range are convinced that anything much over 400 / 400 just makes you more traction limited in third gear 70-100mph range - read that as spinning the tires in third gear at half throttle - how fast do you want to do that?

    It's no faster to 100 (unless maybe you want to run drag slicks) - just more failure / disaster modes + expense.


    Just food for thought for those in the planning stages.

  23. #23
    Senior Member edwardb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lake Orion, Michigan
    Posts
    5,737
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Avalanche325 View Post
    The only thing wrong with a Coyote is the packaging. They are physically HUGE. Besides that, they are a great engine. Price-wise, they are easily $2K - $3k more than an SBF with similar HP.

    I also work on computers all day. I wanted my Cobra to be low tech old school. It gets terrible mileage, needs to warm up, smells like gas and exhaust, is loud, snotty and high strung. PERFECT! The Coyote would be more of a turn the key and go experience. Either engine will make the car go down the road.
    Quote Originally Posted by caesarmascetti View Post
    my 2 cents, when you figure in all the costs, the added complexity (electronics) and the packaging issues what real advantage does a Coyote offer over say this:

    https://performanceparts.ford.com/part/M-6007-Z2363FT

    I mean a ford performance 363 crate motor built on the 302 Boss block puts out over 500hp and has none of the packaging concerns or the electronic complexity.
    I'm a self-admitted Coyote enthusiast, so of course have to comment. I've done two builds with a SBF. First was stock block 302 that was punched out a little, had aftermarket heads, pistons, cam, QuickFuel carb, etc. Ran well and still going strong with its current owner. Second was a pretty high end DART 347 build with forged Scat internals, big AFR heads, custom cam, another QuickFuel carb, etc. Took the time to do a full-on wideband O2 assisted tune on the carb and it ran perfectly. Probably about as good as a carb can run. Was very strong as expected, and is also still going strong with its current owner. After some arm-twisting, decided to try the Coyote on my Anniversary build. Now driven two seasons and I'm fully won over. It has smooth easy power that's as mild or wild as you want. HP and torque of my Gen 2 Coyote is probably similar to the DART 347 build. But it just feels stronger and quicker, and bottom line for me it's easier and more fun to drive. No brainer for me that my current Coupe build would also be a Coyote.

    As far as comparisons go, IMO to be fair you need to compare using EFI. It just has too many advantages to ignore and is one of the reasons the Coyote works as well as it does. The Ford Boss 363 is a nice engine. Kind of a big brother to the DART 347 I did. But dress it out with the pieces it doesn't come with, including EFI, and it's going to be more expensive than a Coyote. I've done the math because my Anniversary build started life to be a 427 small block EFI build. Doing an apples-to-apples analysis, that engine was going to be several thousand more than the Coyote I ended up with.

    Packaging? Yes it's tight in a Roadster. But it's totally sorted and fits. Used to be a compromise to footbox space. No longer. Once it's in, you probably won't have to touch it. There is literally nothing in the maintenance requirements for anything other than oil changes for 100K miles. Pretty crazy. Fit in the Gen 3 Coupe BTW, which has more room, is even less of an issue. Wiring? Yes it's more, maybe. But if you can put the RF harness in one of these the Coyote harness is a breeze. If you're doing EFI, the wiring actually ends up being pretty similar.

    For sure you can do cheaper engines than a Coyote. They're not cheap and not for everyone. I get that. But if you really compare fairly across the board, they are a good value for what they are. In the end the overriding decision point IMO is whether you want a more vintage old-school engine or a newer modern engine. There's no right or wrong answer here. They look different, sound different, and it's a personal choice of what's important to you. I've taken a whole bunch of prospective and current owners for rides in my Coyote powered Anniversary Roadster. All left very impressed. It's hard not to. That's not to say every one decided on the Coyote, but worth saying. These cars are a blast no matter how you power them.
    Last edited by edwardb; 03-14-2019 at 02:07 PM.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  24. Likes Misterfubar, stack, Mark Eaton liked this post
  25. #24
    Not a waxer Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Bloomington, Indiana
    Posts
    4,186
    Post Thanks / Like
    Electrical complexity? If you call connecting 4 wires complex then, yeah, I guess so.



    Jeff

  26. #25
    Senior Member Misterfubar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Olathe, KS
    Posts
    102
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kleiner View Post
    Electrical complexity? If you call connecting 4 wires complex then, yeah, I guess so.



    Jeff
    I'd rather wire a Coyote from scratch than tune a carb. Fortunately, I didn't have to do that. I just plugged in a few harnesses and hooked up those 4 wires.

  27. #26
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    28
    Post Thanks / Like
    +1 on calling Mike Forte for the Coyote package.
    Great guy, great service.
    Hard to beat.

  28. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    30
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
    Not that I'm one to talk, but there is money to be saved with a Ford aluminum bell housing vs. the Quicktime bell. Also the nodular flywheel that comes with the engine is completely usable and most do.
    Yes if the Gen 2 coyote is used. the flywheel that comes on the Gen 3 coyote is not suitable.
    MK4 #9191, Gen 3 Coyote, T56, 2015+ IRS, ABS, 12.88 Wilwood's, FFR Tubular Front LCA's, FFR Spindles

  29. #28
    Senior Member BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Raleigh NC USA
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    COYOTE - Build it, tune it, forget it. Just change the oil, filters & put gas in the tank. Hard to beat as a DD that is maintenance free & very strong. If you drive it every day like I do you will get the side benefit of visiting the gas station less often

    You also get the privilege of pissing the purists off when they see it.
    Kevin
    MKIV #8234
    Coyote '13/TKO-600
    Delivered 2/7/14 - Plate "COYOTE NC1965" 3/25/15

  30. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BEAR-AvHistory View Post
    You should look to places like Summit or other FFR COYOTE packagers.

    They have a pretty complete, fuel pump, starter, alternator, belts, MOROSO pan, etc 435BHP COYOTE for $10K

    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/s...tcombocontents
    wow even with the oil cooler delete, one less step!
    do they notch the dipstick location too?

  31. #30
    Senior Member BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Raleigh NC USA
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by toadster View Post
    wow even with the oil cooler delete, one less step!
    do they notch the dipstick location too?
    Not sure what you mean, but have no issues with the dipstick location & stock stick. Engine comes in a box straight from FORD as built. You bolt on the lose parts starter, alternator belt, alternator, swap FFR headers, oil pan & oil pickup tube, clutch, transmission, fuel pump, gas filter. fuel pressure regulator & its good to go. As said wiring is plug in the plugs & connect 4 wires.



    You require a tune but the side benefit is it will raise the horsepower.

    Have 10,000 miles, so far 3 annual oil changes & other then playing with a different intake for looks & removal of some low end torque along with some dress up items have not touched the engine.



    Can easily spin the tires in 3rd with Nitto 555R 315/35 tires so over say 400/425 a lot is bragging rights rather then actual street performance.

    IIRC the only thing I bought outside of the engine trans package was the Spectre intake tubes.

    FWIW Mike Forte does a lot of the assembly work like trimming the TKO 600 tail shaft (I have air powered cutter) so depending on price its something to look at. Have other stuff from Mike & the service is good.



    Prices have gone up since 2013 but IIRC I paid at the time around $11/12K for the Coyote/TKO-600 FFR package. Got the Spectre intake tubes from Amazon. Was less then I could do buying ala carte parts.
    Last edited by BEAR-AvHistory; 05-12-2019 at 11:43 AM.
    Kevin
    MKIV #8234
    Coyote '13/TKO-600
    Delivered 2/7/14 - Plate "COYOTE NC1965" 3/25/15

  32. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BEAR-AvHistory View Post
    Not sure what you mean, but have no issues with the dipstick location & stock stick.
    i think the moroso pans have been updated, just was making sure (link for reference)

    https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...oso#post238901

  33. #32
    Senior Member BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Raleigh NC USA
    Posts
    806
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by toadster View Post
    i think the moroso pans have been updated, just was making sure (link for reference)

    https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...oso#post238901
    OK understand now. Was one of the group that found part of the sump trap was interfering with the dip stick when we tested it on the original Coyote. They sent us replacement plates & changed their production process. MOROSO was very accommodating & did not duck the problem but fixed it & made us whole.



    The same thing showed up later in the production run (when the next generation Coyote came out??) but I did not follow it.

    Should be old threads on it late 2013 early 2014 on the original issue.
    Last edited by BEAR-AvHistory; 05-13-2019 at 11:59 AM.
    Kevin
    MKIV #8234
    Coyote '13/TKO-600
    Delivered 2/7/14 - Plate "COYOTE NC1965" 3/25/15

  34. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by BEAR-AvHistory View Post

    Can easily spin the tires in 3rd with Nitto 555R 315/35 tires so over say 400/425 a lot is bragging rights rather then actual street performance.
    Not Coyote related, but this bears repeating.

    You can't put any more hp/tq than that on the pavement below 100mph on any "street tire" - you're just making it easier (+ easier) to make a huge operator input error by exceeding those numbers for "street use".
    Last edited by mike223; 05-12-2019 at 12:30 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Flat Irons Tuning

Visit our community sponsor