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Thread: Tools required-Help Please

  1. #1
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    Tools required-Help Please

    This will be my first foray into an auto project of this magnitude so I am pretty lacking in the tool department. I have some of the basic stuff: socket set, clamps, hex keys, screwdrivers, pliers, etc. I am working through the manual and build threads trying to figure out what I really need right now to even start the project, so I am asking the group for some help on tool purchases. I should be getting my kit in about a week so I am going to start getting some items this weekend. Here is the list of items I am thinking right now. Please jump in with the other items I really need.

    Combination wrenches
    snap ring pliers
    Drill Bits (manual lists #30, #11, standard drill bits) How many of each is a good number to get?
    Dead Blow Hammer (I have plenty of claw hammers, but I think I need something coated so as not to scratch right?)
    Jack
    Jack Stands
    Torque Wrench (looks like a 20-150ft/lb would work for almost everything, spindle hub is the only thing I have found that takes more)
    hand grinder
    Breaker Bar (Do I need this?)
    Rags
    Tape
    fuel line benders
    black marker

    Anything else good to have?

  2. #2
    Steve >> aka: GoDadGo GoDadGo's Avatar
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    Add in 40-to-50 1/8" Cleco Fasteners, A Pop Rivet Rivet Gun and a Rivet Nut Gun and the rest you can pick up along the way.

    https://www.rivetsonline.com/

    A quality tubing bender and flare tool is also recommended.

    http://www.eastwood.com/professional...FZBXDQodi_0AYw

    Also, Wide Blue Painters tape is great for keeping things from getting scratched up.
    Last edited by GoDadGo; 06-07-2017 at 09:08 AM.

  3. #3
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    You'll get away with a 100lb torque wrench and then borrow one from autozone for the hubs.
    You can get bulk double-ended bits online - never have too many

    Air riveter or good quality high leverage rivet tool.
    Add 40 3/16" clecos too
    Locktite and ARP thread sealer
    Aerodynamics are for those who can't build engines - Enzo Ferrari

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    Good call guys, I meant to ask about how many clecos to get, and the riveter.

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    Digging up an older thread, but this is the latest "Tools Dedicated" thread. I made an over-thought tools list and I thought I'd share it here for a) critique and b) additions.

    FFR33 Tools List

    Please take a look and offer suggestions.

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    I'm having trouble deciding on a brake line tubing bender and a flaring tool. Could I get some recommendations on both?
    I'll be using Nickle-Copper line, not SS, if that makes a difference.

  7. #7
    Senior Member flynntuna's Avatar
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    I found that using two sockets in a vice ( at least for me) worked better than a tubing bender. The Eastwood flaring tool GoDadGo posted in post#2 is one of the easiest to use and produces great results.

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    Also an inch/pound torque wrench for those small jobs...

  9. #9
    EFI Rules and Carbs Drool Arrowhead's Avatar
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    Boy you guys are going to easy on him, this is the FF forum after all - we love spending other peoples money! No two post lift? No welder and tubing bender for the roll cage? No bead roller or punch dies for that custom aluminum interior panels? No hydraulic press for those axle bearings? No blasting cabinet and powder coating machine? No 60 gallon air compressor and air dryer? No paint booth? You guys need to take some lessons from the roadster guys

    Seriously, at some point you'll want to think about how to lift the engine/trans when the time comes. You could probably rent a hoist when you need it if you don't want to buy one. If your buying a crate engine you probably won't need an engine stand (but they are cheap and plentiful used). You can probably get away without an air compressor, but ti's one of the versatile tools in the garage and it just makes so many jobs easier - especially if your doing any bodywork. As far as a jack, keep in mind the hot rod sits pretty low, so the small 1-1/2 ton jacks can lift the load ok, but they have limited reach and lift and some times they can't pass under the car far enough to grab the middle of the frame (I like to lift as the X brace just in front of the engine).

    The largest driver of what tools you will need will depend on how outside the box you want to go. If you are going to build by the book, then you literally could do it with hand tools. As soon as you start customizing and making modifications is when you start to need more specialized tools.
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  10. #10
    EFI Rules and Carbs Drool Arrowhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    Digging up an older thread, but this is the latest "Tools Dedicated" thread. I made an over-thought tools list and I thought I'd share it here for a) critique and b) additions.

    FFR33 Tools List

    Please take a look and offer suggestions.
    Ya know I looked at the list and at first though "Whoa! I think that's way more than you should need". But then looking at it again, it's like you went though my shop and took inventory of my tools! Not sure how I accumulated all of that (and way more that's not on the list) but it does come in handy.

    That said some things on the list could be consolidated. I don't think you need 50 of each size cleco - that's kind of over kill. Everyone has their own way of doing things, but I don't think you need to put a cleco in every hole of every panel as you drill, but that's me. A lot of cutting tools on the list also. Really isn't a lot of cutting needed. A pair of tin snips and grinder with a death wheel should pretty much be able to take care of any metal work. You shouldn't need full sets of taps either, just go buy them individually as needed. Should only need a couple small ones. For thread chasers I make my own, just take a bolt of the correct size and thread and run the death wheel perpendicular to the thread and make some "troughs" in threads. That way your not cutting any metal but the cut lines through the threads will scrape off any paint or debris.
    Arrowhead's '33 Hot Rod Build Site:
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    I'm having trouble deciding on a brake line tubing bender and a flaring tool. Could I get some recommendations on both?
    I'll be using Nickle-Copper line, not SS, if that makes a difference.
    Eastwood's flaring tool is hard to beat. With NiCop tubing you may find no need for a tube bender, but they are cheap so you might as well get one from Eastwood. One other issue is whether to use 45 degree double flares or 37 degree single flares, or both. I chose 45 for brake lines and found no need for any 37 degree flares. If you run some hard fuel line, you can buy a fitting to to convert to an AN fitting for a flex hose at the end. I used stainless steel braided PTFE hose for fuel lines and transmission cooler lines and have no hard lines, except for brakes.

    https://www.eastwood.com/professiona...ring-tool.html

    https://www.eastwood.com/37-deg-flar...for-25304.html

    https://search.eastwood.com/search?w=tubing%20bender

  12. #12
    Senior Member TDSapp's Avatar
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    On the topic of wrenches.... You need two sets of both SAE and Metric. It always seems like you have to back up the bolt with the same size as the nut so it makes you want two sets. I have also gone away from combination wrenches which have two sizes and now have two sets of wrenches with an open and boxed end of the same size. Having one of the sets with a ratcheting end makes things even better.

    I am talking about a set like this...

    https://www.craftsman.com/products/c...?taxon_id=1905

    The ratcheting wrenches are awesome... But if you buy a metric set like this make sure you got and buy one 16mm wrench. It seems like none of the sets have a 16mm in them and I found I have been using the one I bought.

    --

    If you are going the donor route I would suggest a bench grinder that has a wire wheel. It will help when cleaning up the old bolts and parts. I have spent quite a bit of time sitting at that wire wheel cleaning up bolt after bolt...

    --

    A rolling adjustable work seat is a must... My knees are just not what they were 30 years ago.

    --

    Right before Christmas I picked up a rolling tear down tray and it has been awesome as well. I like being able to take the tools and parts I need and put them on the tray and roll it where ever I need it. I find I am using this more than my bench now.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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    Quote Originally Posted by flynntuna View Post
    The Eastwood flaring tool GoDadGo posted in post#2 is one of the easiest to use and produces great results.
    I was hoping not to spend $200 on a flaring tool. That's one of the reasons for wanting to use NiCop tube is that it's supposed to be more forgiving.

    Quote Originally Posted by SerpantFL View Post
    Also an inch/pound torque wrench for those small jobs...
    Added.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arrowhead View Post
    Boy you guys are going to easy on him, this is the FF forum after all - we love spending other peoples money! No two post lift? No welder and tubing bender for the roll cage? No bead roller or punch dies for that custom aluminum interior panels? No hydraulic press for those axle bearings? No blasting cabinet and powder coating machine? No 60 gallon air compressor and air dryer? No paint booth? You guys need to take some lessons from the roadster guys

    Seriously, at some point you'll want to think about how to lift the engine/trans when the time comes. You could probably rent a hoist when you need it if you don't want to buy one. If your buying a crate engine you probably won't need an engine stand (but they are cheap and plentiful used). You can probably get away without an air compressor, but ti's one of the versatile tools in the garage and it just makes so many jobs easier - especially if your doing any bodywork. As far as a jack, keep in mind the hot rod sits pretty low, so the small 1-1/2 ton jacks can lift the load ok, but they have limited reach and lift and some times they can't pass under the car far enough to grab the middle of the frame (I like to lift as the X brace just in front of the engine).

    The largest driver of what tools you will need will depend on how outside the box you want to go. If you are going to build by the book, then you literally could do it with hand tools. As soon as you start customizing and making modifications is when you start to need more specialized tools.
    Ha! "Must have ALL the tools!" I would if I could - I love tools!

    Seriously though, a good majority of the tools on this list I already own. And it looks like the "Shop" section didn't transfer from my excel spreadsheet to the google spreadsheet - I'll fix that. I have an engine hoist and engine stand (motor is on it right now), and a small compressor. But I don't foresee using too many air tools. I actually prefer cordless and manual over pneumatic - just my preference for better or worse. A couple floor jacks and several jack stands as well.

    My plan is a pretty basic out of the box build. Sure I'll be substituting some upgraded components and using some of my own custom machined parts, but nothing drastically different. My idea is to build it as it comes for the most part, then rebuild/modify at a later date if ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arrowhead View Post
    Ya know I looked at the list and at first though "Whoa! I think that's way more than you should need". But then looking at it again, it's like you went though my shop and took inventory of my tools! Not sure how I accumulated all of that (and way more that's not on the list) but it does come in handy.

    That said some things on the list could be consolidated. I don't think you need 50 of each size cleco - that's kind of over kill. Everyone has their own way of doing things, but I don't think you need to put a cleco in every hole of every panel as you drill, but that's me. A lot of cutting tools on the list also. Really isn't a lot of cutting needed. A pair of tin snips and grinder with a death wheel should pretty much be able to take care of any metal work. You shouldn't need full sets of taps either, just go buy them individually as needed. Should only need a couple small ones. For thread chasers I make my own, just take a bolt of the correct size and thread and run the death wheel perpendicular to the thread and make some "troughs" in threads. That way your not cutting any metal but the cut lines through the threads will scrape off any paint or debris.
    Yeah as the list grew and grew it became almost alarming. But as I checked off what I have already it became surprising how much of it I already have.
    I agree some is overkill and some is just tools "I might need" wink-wink. And some, like the taps, a few sizes are needed but I already have a full tap set so I jut put it on the list as such.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveS53 View Post
    Eastwood's flaring tool is hard to beat. With NiCop tubing you may find no need for a tube bender, but they are cheap so you might as well get one from Eastwood. One other issue is whether to use 45 degree double flares or 37 degree single flares, or both. I chose 45 for brake lines and found no need for any 37 degree flares. If you run some hard fuel line, you can buy a fitting to to convert to an AN fitting for a flex hose at the end. I used stainless steel braided PTFE hose for fuel lines and transmission cooler lines and have no hard lines, except for brakes.
    As I said, the idea with using NiCop is so I don't need top end specialty tools. I like to spend on tools, but have a hard time justifying $200 for a flaring tool. I do need to do some research about fares needed on the Mustang brakes and the Master Cylinder I'll be using (Whitby PB kit) to know what flaring tool I'll need. I've toyed with the idea of running hard fuel lines, so I'll need to think about the flares needed for that as well. Thanks for the links.

    Quote Originally Posted by TDSapp View Post
    On the topic of wrenches.... You need two sets of both SAE and Metric. It always seems like you have to back up the bolt with the same size as the nut so it makes you want two sets. I have also gone away from combination wrenches which have two sizes and now have two sets of wrenches with an open and boxed end of the same size. Having one of the sets with a ratcheting end makes things even better.
    --
    If you are going the donor route I would suggest a bench grinder that has a wire wheel. It will help when cleaning up the old bolts and parts. I have spent quite a bit of time sitting at that wire wheel cleaning up bolt after bolt...
    --
    A rolling adjustable work seat is a must... My knees are just not what they were 30 years ago.
    --
    Right before Christmas I picked up a rolling tear down tray and it has been awesome as well. I like being able to take the tools and parts I need and put them on the tray and roll it where ever I need it. I find I am using this more than my bench now.
    I have multiple set of combination wrenches SAE & Metric, so plenty there. And I have SAE & Metric Gearwrench sets as well - LOVE those things!
    Good idea about the bench grinder.

    Here's the rolling work seat I use... all day, every day.
    tilite-zr.jpg

    Good idea about the rolling tray.

    Thanks for the input guys! Keep it coming! Love this forum!
    Last edited by TxMike64; 02-02-2018 at 01:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SerpantFL View Post
    Also an inch/pound torque wrench for those small jobs...
    Would you have a recommendation on an in-lb torque range?

    I see:
    40-250in-lb
    20-200
    10-150

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    Tx, I am thinking that the 10-150 should cover most twists, if your birthday is near, someone could supply the other two...

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    Unconventional Builder Joee's Avatar
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    I didn't do any flaring, just bought the right length brake lines from auto parts store. You don't need to be an expert at something that is one and done. Same for was dieting an old harness waste of time just get it new harness. There are steps that are time consuming anyway.

    As far as tools get the minimum depending on where you live I never minded stopping by Sears or part store to get that special wrench or socket. My comment you will eventually need both metric and standard 1\4 & 3\8 socktsets and just 1/2 standard set upper to 1 1/8 breaker bars if needed for disassembly. Get light duty 3\8 and heavy duty 1\2 torque wrenches they should cross over are 50=60 lbs. Depending on hardware I also have 1\4 in metric and standard Allen key sockets. Finally box wrenches standard and metric 12pt and 6pt sets screw drivers' center puch, and scratch awl. Good luck
    Roadster Mk3 5294, 302 Comp XE276HR cam, AFR 185 heads, 650 Quick fuel carb, Air Gap intake, T-5 3.55 gear Levy Upper & Lower Front and Rear control arms Purch Jan 2008 Tagged Mar 2012 Best ET 12.14 @113** SOLD 4/8/18 **
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joee View Post
    I didn't do any flaring, just bought the right length brake lines from auto parts store. You don't need to be an expert at something that is one and done.
    Also an option. I'll see when I cross that bridge, but I want to have as few connectors in the system as possible and usually that means custom length lines. I don't need to be an expert or have top level tools, but I want the experience.

    I've always just bought replacement pre-bent brake lines or replaced small sections using a rented inline flaring tool. So now that I'll be making custom lines and needing to flare I'd like to find a decent set of tools to get the job done.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joee View Post
    Same for was dieting an old harness waste of time just get it new harness.
    Yeah, I mean why do the work when you can throw money at it...? Like why build a car when you can just go buy one...
    I've done lots of work for people who's most used tool in their toolbox is their credit card. I've made lot's of money off those people.

  19. #19
    Senior Member TDSapp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    Yeah, I mean why do the work when you can throw money at it...?
    Well for some people this is the best option for what they want. When I look at the wire harness on my 89 Vette it would give me chills just thinking about using it. If it came down to it I would rather buy a new harness than try and get this one to work. My time is worth more than trying to fix and replace every circuit that may have problems.



    As far as tools go... Probably 95% of what I use is on my peg board.




    The far side, other side of the drill press, are my metric wrenches and sockets, and some crescent wrenches.
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    Also, get really familiar with your local parts store and their tool "rental" program. Most of them have a deal where you pay a deposit equal to the value of a tool you need (in case you run off with it) and when you bring the tool back (usually within 48 hours, or else!) you get your deposit back. Saved my bacon last weekend on that 27mm nut in the wrx transmission. Came in a set that I had to pony up $120 for, but beats the snot out of ordering one and waiting for it to come in! I've "borrowed" large sockets, vacuum pumps, pullers, even a piston ring compressor.

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    16mm is soooooo close to 5/8ths sae.

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    I'm going to add a new toy to the list.. this drill sharpener. I followed dizzymarcus recommendation over at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTrbLSm0sOw&t=326s and bought it from Amazon. http://amzn.to/2C4ZFaC

    I ran a bunch of 10 year old bits through it last night (hell, some may be older than that) and I'm impressed. Worked great.
    Aerodynamics are for those who can't build engines - Enzo Ferrari

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  23. #23

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    Don't forget to get a 36mm socket for the axle bolts, they need to be torqued to something like 235 ft-lbs.
    A pipe on the end of a 1/2" breaker bar will do fine.
    Also some 1/2" and 5/8" threaded rod, with nuts and washers to use for spreading apart all the mounting points for all the front and rear suspension mounting tabs for the bushings. All of mine were at least 1/8" too close together for any of the bushings to fit into. If you don't have a powder coated chassis you could just pound on them with a big hammer.
    A cheap bench grinder would be good to have too.
    If you are getting the IRS rear setup one part of the wheel carrier needs to be cut off. It's about 2" long and maybe 3/4" think so a Sawzall or other (saber saw) will be needed. Also for this IRS you'll need to drill out one hole to 5/8".
    FOr a tubing bender and flare tool, get a cheap hand flare and bender if your using NiCu tubing. It will bend and flare very easy.

  24. #24
    Senior Member John Dol's Avatar
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    If your using Ni-cop you don't need a bending tool. I bend all my lines by hand.

    John
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    I second what he said. Ni-cop bends easily by hand. My kit arrived with Rhinohide lines from ffr. I played with the tube bender I had bought for about ten seconds then tossed it in a corner. These lines bend so easy by hand and are actually hard to kink.
    MkIV complete kit #9259, Coyote, TKO600, IRS, Wilwoods x 4, many parts from Breeze, Forte, Russ's Garage and North Racecars
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimLev View Post
    Don't forget to get a 36mm socket for the axle bolts, they need to be torqued to something like 235 ft-lbs.
    I think that's already on my list, but good to specify. I'll probably rent a high-range torque wrench for that one application.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimLev View Post
    Also some 1/2" and 5/8" threaded rod, with nuts and washers to use for spreading apart all the mounting points for all the front and rear suspension mounting tabs for the bushings. All of mine were at least 1/8" too close together for any of the bushings to fit into. If you don't have a powder coated chassis you could just pound on them with a big hammer.
    Yep I've already got that post bookmarked - tab expansion tool.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimLev View Post
    A cheap bench grinder would be good to have too.
    Added.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimLev View Post
    ...get a cheap hand flare and bender if your using NiCu tubing.
    Quote Originally Posted by John Dol View Post
    If your using Ni-cop you don't need a bending tool. I bend all my lines by hand.
    I'm particular about bend radius' and such - which is probably the main reason I'd want a bender, even using NiCop.

    Quote Originally Posted by sbhunter View Post
    ...My kit arrived with Rhinohide lines from FFR....
    Interesting... [Google Searching] PVF black coated mild steel brake lines... Easy to bend/flare and good looks (black). Looks about the same cost as NiCop.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    Interesting... [Google Searching] PVF black coated mild steel brake lines... Easy to bend/flare and good looks (black). Looks about the same cost as NiCop.
    Yes, and o-reillys sell the exact same brand, so I put together my whole system without cutting/flaring a single end. I just had to buy one 2 feet length from o-reillys.
    Aerodynamics are for those who can't build engines - Enzo Ferrari

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    Planned: 350SBC, TKO600, hardtop, no fenders/hood, 32 grill, 3 link, GT500 wheels

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    I'm having trouble deciding on a brake line tubing bender and a flaring tool. Could I get some recommendations on both?
    I'll be using Nickle-Copper line, not SS, if that makes a difference.
    I bought the eastwood flaring tool on sale for $149.95. If and when you are finished using it can easily sell and get most of your money back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TxMike64 View Post
    I think that's already on my list, but good to specify. I'll probably rent a high-range torque wrench for that one application.



    Yep I've already got that post bookmarked - tab expansion tool.



    Added.




    I'm particular about bend radius' and such - which is probably the main reason I'd want a bender, even using NiCop.



    Interesting... [Google Searching] PVF black coated mild steel brake lines... Easy to bend/flare and good looks (black). Looks about the same cost as NiCop.
    A rubber dead blow hammer works well on the suspension mounts. (A lot less time consuming)
    My kit also came with updated brake lines. I used a tubing bender twice and never took the flaring tool out of the tool box.
    Thanks,
    Andy

  30. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Nederland, Texas
    Posts
    265
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    Also if you use copper gaskets on all of your flare fittings, it will eliminate any leaks. I found them at Grainger's.
    Thanks,
    Andy

  31. #31

    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Placitas, NM
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Also get a rattail file. I've found that many of the holes in the front suspension mounts are slightly too small to even pound the bolts thru. Some of the mounting tabs for the bushings are not welded exactly in line with each other which prevents the bolt from going thru to the second hole.

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