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Thread: The turbomacncheese build thread

  1. #41
    I've used inserts before, I'm not worried about them failing, and I already have the standard studs. Hard enough to swallow $375 to fix this. I can't justify another $8-900 on a mild engine like this one.

    Thanks though. Certainly gives me something to think about in the event I decide to build a hi-boost Subaru. Skip the drama and go straight for the big guns.

  2. #42
    Went a bit more smoothly than I had expected. I didn't anticipate needing a 1/2 inch drill, although I suppose I should have. Not gonna lie, I shopped these tools on price, and NS300L came out ahead, but it was the service I got from Norm that sealed the deal on these. Super responsive, and made sure he was giving me the right answer before he'd give me any answer. These inserts are absolutely solid. Here is one, compared to the ARP stud. And don't judge me on all the wood "scraps" in the background. I was irritated last week when this thing went south and started building my dolly instead. Yeah, didn't finish that either. And yes, I bagged the block first.
    20171013_181056.jpg
    Tool comes with a jig to help with drill/tap alignment. It has a slot cut in one end, and a circle in the other for bushings. An alignment pin ensures the jig is set up properly, just hold it down firmly while tightening a bolt into one of the provided spacers.
    2.jpg2.jpg3.jpg
    Duct tape, rags, and more duct tape (most of a roll when it was all said and done) to keep chips (god, so many chips) out of important places.
    20171015_101447.jpg
    Drill it, and keep blowing the chips (god, so many chips) out of the hole. The drill has a blunt tip, so it stops at the bottom of the hole. It doesn't bite, so its easy to tell when the drill isn't loaded anymore and the bit is just spinning.
    4.jpg
    Load the tap bushing and start tapping. It came with two. A 3 flute for the heavy work and most of the tapping, and a 4 flute bottom tap for the last few threads. And don't forget to blow out the chips (god, so many chips). Once I got the first tap in as far as I wanted, I could remove it and the jig, and finish with the 4 flute tap.
    20171015_102257.jpg20171015_103026.jpg
    Engine degreaser for all that cutting fluid, and to help float some of the chips (god, so many chips) before blowing them out with compressed air.
    20171015_103252.jpg
    Super secret acetone source for cleanup
    20171015_103505.jpg20171015_103657.jpg
    I'm out of pictures for this post. Continued in the next one...
    Last edited by turbomacncheese; 10-15-2017 at 09:24 PM.

  3. #43
    Some red threadlock. The kit comes with a small bottle, but I ran out after 8 or so, and had to crack into my stash. Ok, it's not a stash. It's a bottle I bought for the flywheel bolts.
    20171015_103821.jpg
    Install the insert with the provided tool, which fits into notches cut on the insert. You can see where I notched the tool to indicate the proper insert depth. Recommended in the instructions, not my idea.
    20171015_103922.jpg20171015_104034.jpg
    Verify the depth at 1.6 to 1.75 inches.
    20171015_104145.jpg
    After the first couple of inserts, I figured out how far to thread the second tap so the insert would bottom out in the threads at the correct height. Probably doesn't make a difference, but it felt nice to have it snug against something down there. With studs, once they are torqued, I can't imagine the inserts would move at all, even without the locktite. But it did feel a little...off...that they don't have a positive lock like the timeserts. So I checked the couple I did with the insert tool, and I thought I was going to start bending the thing and still the inserts weren't budging. I don't think there is anything to worry about here.

    I double checked for stray aluminum chips (god, so many chips) with my flashlight, air compressor, and some grease, and I'm 99.9999% certain I was successful at keeping them out of anywhere important. If I missed any, they are about the size of standard dust.

    In total, the kit came with the jig, two spacers, a bushing for the drill, one for the taps, cutting fluid, a ruler I didn't use, threadlock I used completely, and SEVENTEEN inserts - which is why I was able to do my whole block. The timesert kit was more expense, and only included 10. Bonus, the outer diameter/threads of these inserts are common between several sizes, so if I end up with a different type of block and the same problem, I may be able to just buy some inserts and get to work. But let's hope I don't have to.

  4. #44
    a fun and successful weekend.
    818S/C : Chassis #25 with 06 WRX 2.5 turbo, ABS, cruise, PS, A/C, Apple CarPlay, rear camera, power windows & locks, leather & other complexities.
    Mk3 Roadster #6228 4.6L, T45, IRS, PS, PB, ABS, Cruise, Koni's, 17" Halibrands, red w/ silver - 9K miles then sold @ Barrett-Jackson Jan 2011 (got back cash spent).

  5. #45
    I don't know that fun is the right word. Maybe if I had anticipated this expense, and didn't have to call all my friends to borrow a drill....

    Satisfying, yes. Successful, yes. Fun...ask me again once it's running, lol.

  6. #46
    Well well well, guess who showed up?
    20171022_172617.jpg
    Kids were happy to finally see it.
    818 max and bee.jpg 818 lil tony.jpg

    I took personal time from work Monday/Tuesday in case the truck ran into problems and was late, but he was EARLY so I had all day Monday to inventory and Tuesday to remove/store body parts and aluminum. Inventory only saw a couple issues not marked on the POL, which have already been addressed by Factory Five, so no worries. I will say that it's a little...sad to pay a couple thousand to prepare for a project like this, 10k for the project, and a couple more to ship it and then get a part with rusty brackets. But I'll clean them up and paint them, and it will all be ok. Just a bit odd to have all these laser cut parts, tig welds on the frame, the whole thing computer designed... and then grass and dirt stuck to the inside of the doors. Whatever, I'm still stoked and so are the kids. This thing is going to be RAD.
    20171024_171616.jpg

  7. #47
    Senior Member flynntuna's Avatar
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    Well at least one in the family will pass the broomstick test.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #48
    Moonlight Performance
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    Congrats on the kit delivery. That's always an exciting day.

  9. #49
    That's a perfect pic to show where you started. Needs a "vroom, vroom"!

    http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/attac...2&d=1508896595
    818S/C : Chassis #25 with 06 WRX 2.5 turbo, ABS, cruise, PS, A/C, Apple CarPlay, rear camera, power windows & locks, leather & other complexities.
    Mk3 Roadster #6228 4.6L, T45, IRS, PS, PB, ABS, Cruise, Koni's, 17" Halibrands, red w/ silver - 9K miles then sold @ Barrett-Jackson Jan 2011 (got back cash spent).

  10. #50

  11. #51
    You are sick, Tony! Fortunately, you are starting a build, which can be therapeutic.
    818S/C : Chassis #25 with 06 WRX 2.5 turbo, ABS, cruise, PS, A/C, Apple CarPlay, rear camera, power windows & locks, leather & other complexities.
    Mk3 Roadster #6228 4.6L, T45, IRS, PS, PB, ABS, Cruise, Koni's, 17" Halibrands, red w/ silver - 9K miles then sold @ Barrett-Jackson Jan 2011 (got back cash spent).

  12. #52
    Seriously, this engine should have been back together 3 weekends ago. Found a TON of corrosion in the vent tube. Looked like swiss cheese once I started poking at it. And it looked GREAT before I scrubbed the powder coat off. I only started poking at it because it blew very VERY small bubbles after a degreaser bath.swiss cheese.jpg Those all started as pinholes that showed up after I started heating it to get rid of some of the gunk inside. After the second hole, it was just to see how many were there.

    Got the wrong cam gear bolts from flatirons, but the timing covers are beautiful.



    I also spent an hour looking for the dipstick tube because that's what happens when you have 4 or 5 months between taking something apart and putting it back together. Finally found it by accident as I was quitting for the day on a shelf I checked at least 4 times.
    Current state of affairs.
    current state.jpg

  13. #53
    I think I lost 5-6 cumulative hours on my build looking for the ratchet I had in my hand

  14. #54
    Senior Member q4stix's Avatar
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    Shoot, I'm going to need to fly you to my place for my WRX daily driver engine build. Talk about clean!
    Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe builder

  15. #55
    Since I mentioned the bolts I got from FlatIrons, I gotta say that they got back to me this afternoon. I feel like they took really good care of me here, and I won't hesitate to spend money there in the future. FlatIrons Tuning: expectations = exceeded.

    Quote Originally Posted by phil1734 View Post
    I think I lost 5-6 cumulative hours on my build looking for the ratchet I had in my hand
    No joke. I did that a couple times yesterday looking for gaskets I was holding on to.

    Quote Originally Posted by q4stix View Post
    Shoot, I'm going to need to fly you to my place for my WRX daily driver engine build. Talk about clean!
    Thanks, that really did feel good to hear! Now that I've got a little practice, we should be able to knock out your engine in what, 5 maybe 6 weekends? lol.
    Last edited by turbomacncheese; 11-06-2017 at 08:58 PM.

  16. #56
    Pretty sure I got everything where it's supposed to go on this engine up to the turbo except the alternator (which I'm going to have tested) and the power steering pump (which I'm going to try rebuilding). Got the front axles apart tonight. Spent about an hour on one of them during the weekend. Tried banging them through the press, no dice.

    Finally, tonight, went through my bucket-o-bits that I keep next to the press and found some steel collars from when I took the wheel bearings apart. Did a fair job of staying on the cv spider. I took both boots off the axle, as well as the 3-prong gimmick on the other side so it was just axle and cv stub. Propped the steel collar up on the press plates, removed the ram so I had more room, slid the axle into the collar(stub up), grabbed the stub, raised it high and slammed it down about 6 times (a la pipe trick) and it finally let go. Did the other axle the same way and it popped off with the first go (wasn't even that hard).
    20171120_182122S.jpg

  17. #57
    fasterer and furiouser longislandwrx's Avatar
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    Rasmus has a great write up on Nabisco about rebuilding the PS pump. i bought the o-ring kit on eBay after someone mistakenly filled mine with power steering fluid (hint don't)

    mine's been leak free for a year now and making great pressure.


    you are going to need long PS lines to make it work, do you have some sourced?
    A well stocked beverage fridge is the key to any successful project.

  18. #58
    I think I came across that writeup before, plus a few videos on youtube. It'll be my first, but no reason I can't do it. And I gotta say that's the first time I heard somebody say "Don't put power steering fluid in a power steering pump." Care to enlighten me?

    As for the lines, AZPete had some made around here someplace, and I'm sure he'll share the secret with me when I get that far.

  19. #59
    Put in the front firewall this long weekend. drilled the two bottom floor pans but didn't attach either one. I know I'll want the rear off for access to the seats. Not sure of any reason to leave the front off, but I'll come up with something, I'm sure.

    Also put my front wheel bearings/hubs back together. Checked the brake disks for thickness/runout and decided to run them as is. Put together my coilovers and tore the Koni sticker, so I guess those are pointing INSIDE now, lol.

    Stopped there because when I did my inventory I noticed I was missing the zirk/cotter pin for one of the upper ball joints, and somehow did NOT register that I was missing the f'ing BOOTS. I said it somewhere else, but I can be pretty dense sometimes.

    On a related note, did anybody else get opened upper ball joints from FFR?
    Last edited by turbomacncheese; 11-28-2017 at 07:27 AM.

  20. #60
    Put all the suspension stuff in (minus the sway bar, which didn't fit...Cobb) and knocked a hole in the firewall for the left control arm.

    Still trying to make up my mind about the motor mounts. They look good, but I could drill em and fill em with urethane, or weld them up solid. Like all other things, I should probably drive it first, lol.

    Steering column, brake master, clutch master, pedal box, and loud pedal also in.

    Got parts for the power steering pump rebuild yesterday, and I need to figure out how I want to handle the clutch, as well.

    This part of the build is going much faster than I expected (still pretty slow for me) based on my progress up to this point, so I'm a little "caught with the pants down" so to speak on not having parts.

  21. #61
    moving in the right direction, keep it up! Any new photos?
    Factory Five 818c #456

  22. #62
    I'll probably take some this weekend when I rebuild the steering pump. Glad to know people are interested!

  23. #63
    Definitely interested and watching.

  24. #64
    Had a good day yesterday. So good that I stopped early before something could go wrong.
    20180113_144721~1.jpg

    My parking brake wasn't engaging the disc, so I dug into it. Turns out the top strut had fallen out of it's grooves while I tried to finagle all the pieces together. Got that sorted.

    Bolted up the calipers and found that I must have bent one of the dust shields at some point (probably removing the hub). The caliper stuck over just far enough bind up the disc when it was bolted on. 20 minutes with a prybar and a mallet fixed that problem. I'll probably end up getting another one, but I'm not sure yet whether I want to leave the rear brakes stock.
    20180113_144746~1.jpg20180113_144731~1.jpg20180113_144754~1.jpg

    Tested the brakes with air pressure, and they grab, so that's good, too. Yes, I moved the rear brake lines so they would point towards the front. I rebuilt those months ago and bolted the lines back on before I was sure which way to point them (check one of the later pictures ). However, if you see anything else pointed the wrong way, I didn't fix that, so please tell me.

    Rebuilt the power steering pump. In retrospect, I'm torn about not getting the $10 bearing and the seal that goes behind it. They both looked good, and didn't seem to be failure points right now, but I had the whole thing apart. If they do fail, at least I'll know whether or not I can rebuild the pump at that point. If I can't rebuild the pump, I'll have saved that money. If I can rebuild the pump, the o-rings were $11 shipped.
    20180113_144036~1.jpg

    And....I put the donor wheels on it and pulled it off the dolly. I just wanted to see it on the ground. I still haven't tightened the moving suspension pieces, although I had the idea of loading the family into it to push it down. Then I reconsidered the likely conversation -

    wife: "Why do you need us in it?"
    me: "Well, I don't have the engine in, and I need something heavy...."

    Then there would be a long delay in thread updates followed by pictures of why I hadn't worked on it in a while, except instead of pictures of a smashed thumb it would be pictures of my smashed face. So I'm waiting on the suspension.
    20180113_154833~1.jpg

    I was prepared for how low it would sit because I read the shock and surprise in other build threads. You don't get to read about how impressed I was, because I wasn't impressed. Sorry. However, my wife (who has been driving the minivan) said "Wow, that's really low!!!"

    Am I going to have to/want to put it back on the dolly at any point? I still haven't installed the underside aluminum, but I can't do that on the dolly anyway. If I don't need it anymore, I want to take it apart. Not a lot of room in the garage, as you can see, once the kids start dragging their stuff out, and this thing is an accident waiting to happen.

    So I started cleaning up, and wifey says "You're done already?" I said "Yeah, stopping before I screw something up." And that was my Saturday.

  25. #65
    Senior Member q4stix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbomacncheese View Post
    although I had the idea of loading the family into it to push it down. Then I reconsidered the likely conversation -

    wife: "Why do you need us in it?"
    me: "Well, I don't have the engine in, and I need something heavy...."

    Then there would be a long delay in thread updates followed by pictures of why I hadn't worked on it in a while, except instead of pictures of a smashed thumb it would be pictures of my smashed face.
    I'm quoting this to make sure no one glances over it. It got me to chuckle aloud, that's for sure!
    Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe builder

  26. #66
    Well, if I have an audience....no reason we can't have a chuckle or three!

  27. #67
    Big, productive weekend at the Richmond house. I started out by deciding I would refill my motor mounts. Picked up some Shore 90A polyurethane from a local hobby shop for $34.83. A little heat, and the rubber mounts pop right out. 375 seems to be the magic temperature, if you're curious.
    Mount takeapart.jpg

    Bunch of tape, some strategically placed silicone caulk, and voila...ready for pouring. I backed them in some tubs of crushed walnut because I have some sitting around. Duct tape actually worked pretty well, though, and I only had a couple small leaks.
    Mounts poured.jpg

    Poured and cured.
    mount.jpg
    If you look closely, you'll see that I shortened the trans mount almost an inch, and grew the motor mounts about 3/8. That should take care of the motor tilt issue. I almost had a confirmation, but more on that later.
    trans mount comparison.jpg
    All things considered, this was a really cheap way to try out some super hard urethane for mounts. But I did learn some lessons. I reused the stock mounts partly because I already had them, and partly because I like that they are "captured" and movement will be limited if the urethane fails. BUT, they were a real pain to tape up into shape. I measured everything before I got started, but I think I would have picked up some silicone molding stuff for another thirty bucks and made molds of them to fill instead. As it was, I just ended up filling in all the space that was void in the stock mounts - partly because I was too lazy to figure anything else out, partly because I wanted them to be RIGID, and partly because I didn't have any ideas about what to do with the rest of the urethane when I was done anyway. To overfill the mounts like this took 3lbs, if anyone is keeping score.
    If I did it again (which I might) I'd buy a bandsaw and cut my own engine mounts. Probably would have cost another 20 bucks, less if could reuse the bolts from the stock mounts, plus the cost of the bandsaw (which I probably need anyway). Regardless, I'm really happy with the trans mount and wouldn't change anything. Still a bargain. I expect these mounts to come in somewhere just shy of solid mounts in the vibration department. Probably end up going back for 70A next time because this was really fun.

    Found this bit of scrap in my bucket o bits from the donor takedown. I think it was a suspension bracket in it's previous life. Did a great job holding the flywheel so I could torque the bolts properly (with locktite, red).
    20180128_170246.jpg

    Anyway, flywheel was on, so lets try the clutch. Clutch went easy, lets bolt up the trans. Next thing you know....
    20180128_193758.jpg
    I had to remove the AC compressor and my oil drain plug to get her in there. The drain plug on my donor was the really trick piece that has a lever and a 1/4 turn ballcock so you can drain the oil with no tools. But it sticks out about an inch. I know, I don't have everything plumbed like the pcv, fuel, vacuum stuff, spark plugs, etc etc.
    I was hoping to see if the engine/trans sat level with my modified mounts, but something went awry. It's entirely possible that I didn't measure something right on the mounts which is totally my fault, but it's hard to see being off that far, given the mount design.
    *edit* Actually, I can see where I lost about 1/8" on the mounts, when comparing them to "before photos". I'll probably end up clearanc-ing that slot on the frame so everything can drop down, but I ran out of time tonight. Everything looks square and straight, just ever so slightly closer to the firewall.
    20180128_193424.jpg

    Also, I think there is a plastic bit that is supposed to cover this up, but I haven't found it yet. Might have to get another from Subaru (yuck).
    20180128_184555.jpg
    Last edited by turbomacncheese; 01-28-2018 at 11:16 PM.

  28. #68
    Very nice on the motor mounts, the whole project is really staring to come together!

    Sounds like you've got a fumoto oil drain valve on there. Not sure I would run it on the 818 though
    Factory Five 818c #456

  29. #69
    Senior Member STiPWRD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbomacncheese View Post
    20180113_144746~1.jpg
    Tested the brakes with air pressure, and they grab, so that's good, too. Yes, I moved the rear brake lines so they would point towards the front. I rebuilt those months ago and bolted the lines back on before I was sure which way to point them (check one of the later pictures ). However, if you see anything else pointed the wrong way, I didn't fix that, so please tell me.
    Is there a chance you switched the RH/LH sides on the rear calipers? It looks like your bleeder screw is lower than it should be, which will trap air in the caliper when you try to bleed it. The bleeder screw should be at the highest point possible.

  30. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn818c View Post
    Sounds like you've got a fumoto oil drain valve on there. Not sure I would run it on the 818 though
    I'm planning on checking how close it is to the ground once everything is together, but other than clearance is there any particular reason? Don't get me wrong, I change a lot more oil on my DD and maybe I'll get lucky enough that it fits there instead, but still?

    Quote Originally Posted by STiPWRD View Post
    Is there a chance you switched the RH/LH sides on the rear calipers? It looks like your bleeder screw is lower than it should be, which will trap air in the caliper when you try to bleed it. The bleeder screw should be at the highest point possible.
    With me, that is a VERY real possibility. I vaguely remember thinking that was odd, but that's about all. The calipers have "L" and "R" embossed on them, an where they are right now, the "L" is up on the left side and the "R" is up on the right side. And of course, now that I think about it, that would happen even if I switched them around...which I should probably do. Thanks.

  31. #71
    Super slow day today. I scored some lightly used seats for $100, sprayed them down, cut some fuel lines (probably too short), attempted to find the straight rubber tube that I'm supposed to use for the gas filler tube, and put together the shifter bracket. I actually think that's about it. I looked at a lot of stuff, searched through my shelves for about an hour looking for random things (found the brake discs I had cut for my Hyundai last year and never installed, so that's good...), and tried to solidify some plans, but that's about it.

    Good thing I forgot to post this picture last week. At least I can feel good about posting something.

    update.jpg

  32. #72
    Just ground clearance would be my only concern on the drain valve, i've never heard of failures or leaks from them.
    Factory Five 818c #456

  33. #73
    I'll double check it. I think it stops angled away from the ground, so because of the bevel in the oil pan right there, the pan actually hangs a little lower than the valve. Thanks.

  34. #74
    Senior Member Canadian818's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turbomacncheese View Post
    Super slow day today. I scored some lightly used seats for $100, sprayed them down, cut some fuel lines (probably too short), attempted to find the straight rubber tube that I'm supposed to use for the gas filler tube, and put together the shifter bracket. I actually think that's about it. I looked at a lot of stuff, searched through my shelves for about an hour looking for random things (found the brake discs I had cut for my Hyundai last year and never installed, so that's good...), and tried to solidify some plans, but that's about it.

    Good thing I forgot to post this picture last week. At least I can feel good about posting something.

    update.jpg
    I have days like that in the garage all the time. As the project nears the end you spend less time looking for things, or maybe it’s more time looking for less things.
    Adam __________________ Instagram @brap818
    818 SRX - #91
    Arrived 01/02/2014
    First Start 10/31/2016
    First Drive 05/22/2017
    My widebody 13b-REW powered build thread

  35. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by STiPWRD View Post
    Is there a chance you switched the RH/LH sides on the rear calipers? It looks like your bleeder screw is lower than it should be, which will trap air in the caliper when you try to bleed it. The bleeder screw should be at the highest point possible.
    I like listening to re-runs. Heard this one today, in fact. I'm just going to leave it right here. About 3.5 minutes to listen.

    https://player.fm/series/series-1324...ipstick?t=1107

  36. #76
    Man, you're making huge progress.
    I too, am starting with a Saab. You started a few months before me.

    You don't know it, but I'm racing you. I thought I'd catch up, and beat you to the finish line.
    Jokes on me though, since I don't even have the fire wall finished yet. You're about to win, and you didn't even know you were racing!

  37. #77
    hahahahahahahha, I do that too!! Heads up, if I had to do the front firewall again, I would NOT put the rivets in until after the brake MC, clutch MC, and pedal box were squared away. Maybe even the front suspension. Leave that junk cleco'd as long as you can!!!

    Another slow weekend. Too much time trying to figure out the wagon seatbelt spools. Provisions are blocked by the firewall, and no help from the manual except "Bolt the wagon spools here, and mind the slot." I found a few threads where guys have notched the firewall, but I didn't feel good about my ability to do that WELL, plus I really wanted the room behind the seat because wifey likes to recline more than I do. Got it sorted by mounting them in the engine bay and slotting the firewall. I don't like putting a hole in the firewall (not that it's anywhere near as big as the gaping maw I get to shove wires through later) so I'll probably end up building a shield for it. It also requires unbolting the spools any time I remove the firewall (which should hopefully not happen often).
    From the engine bay...
    FormatFactory20180218_174527.jpg
    The slot...
    FormatFactory20180218_174539.jpg
    From the cabin...
    FormatFactory20180218_174555.jpg


    I also repurposed the gas tank straps from my donor to hold the firewall in. I marked holes using the firewall as a template, threaded the bolts through both, then tacked them in.
    FormatFactory20180217_161232.jpg
    I used the bolts to mark holes in the rubber sleeve for the strap, punched those out, and fed the bolts into the holes I drilled through the floor. Tightened some bolts to hold the strap in place, then ran some rivets through the floor, rubber, and strap.
    FormatFactory20180217_163332.jpg

    Added some riv-nuts for the top, and now my firewall goes on and off without me drilling any rivets or crawling under the car.

    Last thing was reading up on the charcoal canister. As cheap as it might be to build one, I kinda have this free monstrosity hanging around already. I might mount it up front. Kind of a lot happening in the rear right now. We'll see!

    Next weekend I want to get the seat brackets finished. I'm attempting to use the stock slider for the driver's side with aftermarket seats. Passenger can piss off about adjustability. Might get an inch or so anyway. Like AZPete said..."BUILD YOUR OWN CAR!!"
    Last edited by turbomacncheese; 02-19-2018 at 09:27 PM.

  38. #78
    The belt spools are more or less correct if on the wrong side. You'll want to preserve the anti-rotation bit of the spool provided by the tab which is why most people notch the firewall. I did it by drilling an 1/8" inch hole at each end of where the tab/slot is, then using a small dremel wheel to connect the two holes. In addition, if you (or anyone reading this) is using the iWire ECU box it won't fit with the spools on the back, and you have to space it out to clear the nut even with the spools on the front.

    And I hate to bust your bubble but the firewall is still far from easily removed. Obviously your seats will be in the way but the parking brake mount also has to be removed. Which is a PITA. And the little tiny piece of firewall that wraps around the gas tank in the middle will need removed to get the passenger side out, maybe the drivers side.

  39. #79
    Senior Member STiPWRD's Avatar
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    1,277
    Quote Originally Posted by turbomacncheese View Post
    I like listening to re-runs. Heard this one today, in fact. I'm just going to leave it right here. About 3.5 minutes to listen.

    https://player.fm/series/series-1324...ipstick?t=1107
    18 gallons of brake fluid later...

  40. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by STiPWRD View Post
    18 gallons of brake fluid later...
    Glad you enjoyed that!!

    Quote Originally Posted by phil1734 View Post
    And I hate to bust your bubble but the firewall is still far from easily removed. Obviously your seats will be in the way but the parking brake mount also has to be removed. Which is a PITA. And the little tiny piece of firewall that wraps around the gas tank in the middle will need removed to get the passenger side out, maybe the drivers side.
    Guess I should have been clear. I meant while I'm building. I sure as heck hope I don't have to remove it very often once I'm done!! Only thing under there to replace is the fuel pump/filter. Maybe I should make a panel while I'm at it...

    As far as the seatbelt goes, it still locks when I pull the belt out too fast, and I verified that the gravity thing works on my bench. Not going to bother jacking the car way up to test. I DID pull out the child seat function thing, that flips when the belt is pulled all the way out.

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