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Thread: Some thoughts after selling a few FFR cars.

  1. #1
    PLATNUM Supporting Member
    wallace18's Avatar
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    Some thoughts after selling a few FFR cars.

    I have been very fortunate to have built several kits for myself as well as customers. I have run into some issues down the road, I would like to pass on to those selling their car in the future.

    1. Not every buyer is aware of what a kit car is. They think they are just like an new OEM car and become upset with the lack of P/B, P/S, soft clutch, ETC.
    2. Lots of time the buyer is a person in their late 60's or 70's. They remember these cars from their youth and now have the funds to buy one without remebering of how different cars drove in the 1960's. They soon find out it does not operate like the 2017 OEM they now own.
    3. These cars are not the easiest to get in and out of. Once again age comes to the forefront to shake the memories of youth.

    What can you do about this? Well make them test drive it before buying if possible. If that is not possible then there is not much you can do, if they fall out of love with the car soon after buying. In almost every case when a 70+ year old has bought one of my cars they soon get rid of it due to the lack of comfort and ease of operation vs new OEM cars.

    This does not mean everyone will feel this way. I just want to pass on some experiences I have had to future sellers. I think these are great cars but, they are not your everyday kind of vehicle. They can bring great joy and fun as long as your expectations are not that this is a new OEM car. Just my 2-cents worth. Take care and God Bless.

  2. #2
    A guy I knew said the same thing about restoring old cars. People wanted a car they fell in love with or owned when they were younger. They forget just how bad cars were back then. A fully restored Mustang is still 50 year old technology.
    My wife had a 1997 Corvette that she totaled. after that we bought her a couple of Lexus. She wanted back in to a Corvette. We bought her a 2002 Essentially the same car as the 1997. She said how much better her old one drove compared to the newer one. I tried to explain it was the same car, you just drove better cars in between.
    Mike

  3. #3


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    Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
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    I think you make some valid points. Even though the offerings from FFR are excellent for what they are they are still...what they are. No doubt the old looking back through rose colored glasses deal is at play many times. I think it takes a different frame of mind to truly enjoy these cars and part of that, except for a very select few, is to not consider them as a daily driver type vehicle. Probably explains why many of them have only been driven a couple thousand miles over the course of several years.

    Jeff

  4. #4
    I have had similar thoughts when looking at the cars I drove in the fifties and sixties. I have often said that even though they were fun and exciting back then, looking at the interiors and seeing just how hard and Spartan they are, I don't want to own one now. There was absolutely no safety equipment, road and wind noise was high, the tube radios took a few minutes to come on and tuning was by hand, no power windows and door locks at least for the majority of the cars, AC was an option that half of the cars didn't have as well as power brakes, and the brake system faded during a 60 to zero stop.
    King
    Roadster #8127, ordered 7/12/13, received 9/11/13
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  5. #5
    I have fond memories of the many cars I owned and several demos like a Boss 302 Cougar Eliminator, Shelby GT500KR, GT390 Mustangs (6), 396SS Chevelle, Olds W31, Silver Anniversary Corvette with an LS7 454, etc. A few years ago I got to drive my friend's 440 6-Pack 'Cuda and a 67 Corvette 427, I didn't say anything negative at the time but I had a rude shock as to how my memory was so different from the actual experience today.
    We are living the dream today, high performance in every area of the vehicle with excellent fuel economy, excellent reliability coupled with much improved ergonomics sets a high bar for assembled vehicles to attain.

  6. #6
    Steve >> aka: GoDadGo GoDadGo's Avatar
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    I'm so glad that I got to ride in and drive two Factory Five Roadsters before purchasing my kit.
    It really helped me decide on how I wanted things configured.
    It also opened my eyes regarding what to expect.

  7. #7
    The Traveler R. Button's Avatar
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    And here I went old school - carb with choke plate that kicks in on every startup, fresh smell of gas vapors, BUT like Wayne use to say ... nothing takes the issues of the day go away like sitting in a Mark I (ok or Mark II, or III or IV ) and starting up the engine!
    Ralph Button
    FFR 1436 (PROUD Owner of an Original Mark I)
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    Now a well broken in 347 engine
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    "It's not about the destination, it's the about the journey. And where is your journey taking you?"

  8. #8
    People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one.

  9. #9
    I've been around long enough (nothing further needs to be said...) to cite a list of cars going way back. We never could afford anything very fancy, but certainly agree current modern cars are light years better. Included in the list are gems like Vega, Pinto, Citation, Chrysler K-cars, you get the idea. My first car in high school was a 60's vintage Triumph. What a piece of work that was. Learned about Lucas way back then. I go to enough car shows and cruises now to see just about everything going back 50 years and sometimes more. Nostalgic and all, but most would not pass as "good cars" by today's standards. As the famous writer Franklin Pierce Adams said many years ago, "Nothing is more responsible for the good old days than a bad memory."

    That's one of the reasons I so enjoy these cars. They are a tribute to the vintage cars of the 60's, but with modern brakes, suspension components, etc. Add even more modern stuff like power steering, fuel injection, etc. and it just gets better. I still wouldn't use mine as a daily driver (living in Michigan doesn't help) but drive it as much as I can and it doesn't get old. To the OP's point, I've sold two and in the process spoken with lots of prospective buyers. Absolutely agree the clientele is on the older side and with memories of these back in the day. I don't let prospective buyers drive them (and usually they don't want to) but they get a spirited ride and know full well what they're getting.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
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  10. #10
    Seasoned Citizen
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    Words of wisdom from mike223: "People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one."

    I believe Mike summed it up very concisely and it has nothing to do with age or memories of the good old days. If you don't have the skills or experience building a hot rod (or kit car) you will not likely have a frame of reference to appreciate how different these vehicles are from factory built cars. Without that frame of reference your expectations could be very unrealistic. Caveat emptor!

  11. #11
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    When I was picking up my GTM at FFR they told me a customer had just been in earlier that month to pick up their kit. While there they sat in a completed GTM and couldn't get out on their own. Imagine the feeling of paying for a car you can't drive! They didn't tell me specifics but said they worked with the customer to purchase a different kit since the GTM wouldn't work for them.

  12. #12
    I didn’t build my MKII and never built a car. I love my car, how it drives, the way it looks and how it performs. I guess I’m the one odd ball out there.
    Mark
    Mk1, Frame #1929 stock 1990 EFI 302, T5, 8.8 axle 3:55, PS, Heidts, heat, fresh air vents, Russ Thompson Turn Signal mod, windshield wings FFR front lower control arms.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by redline View Post
    When I was picking up my GTM at FFR they told me a customer had just been in earlier that month to pick up their kit. While there they sat in a completed GTM and couldn't get out on their own. Imagine the feeling of paying for a car you can't drive! They didn't tell me specifics but said they worked with the customer to purchase a different kit since the GTM wouldn't work for them.
    I think we always expect a few mistakes when ordering a complex kit with so many parts, and mine was no exception. But FFR has bent over backwards to make it right and keep me happy. I'm not surprised at all that they helped this GTM customer that way, and I'm proud to be a customer.

  14. #14
    Hi Tom,

    Enjoyed your outlook on this subject! Since I bought my MK4 from you I would like to respond.. I do admit in my exitement to own my dream car for the last 47 years there were a few things I overlooked, Like this is a RaceCar not a SportsCar (Miata, Honda S2000 etc.. and you are right I never realized how challenging it can be to get in and out of the car! Yes a cable clutch with a racing clutch is definately different than My Mini Cooper JCW Hyrdolic setup. That all being said if I had to do it over again I would ask a couple of more questions but all in all I am super happy with the Cobra you built that now sits in my garage waiting for the Spring weather to arrive. What makes the whole thing work so good is having a new friend like you who not only delivers an excellent car but the time you have spent replying to some of my dumb questions of what I need to know so I can do what I want to have the car be everything I would like it to be. So in short, yep it's a racecar. yes its got a heavy clutch and it's hard to get in and out of... Would I buy again? YES SIR and I would recommend the car and Tom Wallace to anyone who wants to know if I like (love) my car! YEP sure would.. Happy new Year everyone, This is my first Post. Stewart
    Last edited by slshearer; 01-10-2018 at 12:55 PM.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by mburger View Post
    I didnít build my MKII and never built a car. I love my car, how it drives, the way it looks and how it performs. I guess Iím the one odd ball out there.
    This is all about expectations, I disagree that someone who doesn't have the skills to build the car won't like it. I can't build an airplane.. but still might like to fly it. (Fortunately for the rest of the world I don't have a pilots license)

    IF a customer tells me I want it like my Corvette. I tell them straight up. ITs not going to happen.

    But when built correctly, with understanding of what a customer wants and what they will use the car for, these cars can be built and sold with a high level of satisfaction

    Heavy clutches, hard steering, poor handling, too loud, poor idle, smelly exhaust, Most of the things people don't like about these cars an be resolved with a clear understanding of what they want and expect.
    FFinisher/AKA RE63

  16. #16
    EFI Rules and Carbs Drool Arrowhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike223 View Post
    People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one.
    I don't necessarily agree with this. I think if a person with limited skills bought a QUALITY build, then they could be perfectly happy. And that goes for any type of vehicle, not just a FFR. You could go out and drop $100K on a '69 Camaro and hate it too if it's not a quality build or has poor driveability (just because it cost six figures doesn't mean it's been built to high standards). Plenty of people have bought brand new vehicles only to hate them because they are in the shop more than being driven. Now if someone buys an FFR without doing their research on what they are like to own and drive, that's a different problem.
    Arrowhead's '33 Hot Rod Build Site:
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  17. #17
    I bought a restored 1964 Cadillac convertible (driver, not a show car). It was close to the top of the food chain in 64. Power steering, brakes, A/C, 6-way adjustable power seats, power windows, cruise control, headlights automatically dim with on coming head lights, radio with seek and scan. All in 1964. But by today's standards its a terrible car. If I bought that car with the wrong expectations I'd be terribly disappointed. With the right frame of mind, its and absolute blast.
    -Steve
    MK IV #8901 - Complete kit, Coyote, TKO-600, IRS. Ordered 5/23/16, Delivered 7/14/16, First Start 8/13/17, First Go-Kart 10/22/17. Build Thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...V-Coyote-Build

  18. #18
    Great post. I agree to what mike said. If you didn't build it you may or may not truly appreciate its purpose. It sounds a bit cynical but its the truth.

    I came form Jeeps and trucks that drove like a Conestoga wagon. My car is not going to disappoint me because I have driven much worse; often, older cars that I have restored or modified.
    F5R9196 Hand built 347 475hp EFI | T5Z | LSD 3.73 3-link | Power Steering | Power Brakes | Vintage Air | 315/35ZR17 & 275/40ZR17 NT555
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Big Blocker's Avatar
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    Just to add another thought to the thread;

    I wanted a Cobra from way back in '64 when a friends son bought one of the first 289 Cobras from 'Ol Shel . . . White with blue stripes. I got a few rides in that car and was "bitten" way back then.

    Fast forward to modern times and F5 comes out with a replica I can afford. Having been a FORD mechanic for a good part of my younger days, I felt I could easily build a car, heck, I had been working on cars since elementary school (about 10). I pretty much knew what I was getting in to and signed up for the whole package; busted knuckles, things that would need band-aids, ice packs to sore muscles, Advil and 1000's of trips to the hardware store for everything imaginable, not to mention countless hours skimming thru Summit, Jegs, Speedway and a few others.

    Yup, signed up for the "E" ticket ride . . . cold mornings, hot afternoons, rain, wind, sore back from untold hours in the MK I fiberglass seat (now replaced with MK IV), the smell of gas, the loud pipes, no PS, no PB, no A/C or heat, no top, no windshield wipers, no defroster, or anything you can imagine that would make me think I'm in a modern car.

    But I love it . . . the raw power, the constant roar of the pipes, the thumbs up and the smiles from on-lookers as I pass by. I can just imagine what their thoughts are; "Wish I had one of those . . ."
    Bottom line here is, I bought / built my car to be just what it is, the way it is. Wouldn't trade that feeling for a newer vehicle, might own a few of them, but wouldn't trade down for anything available now-a-days for my Cobra.

    Some day I'll have to sell her, I hope the next owner is as willing to experience what I have experienced, knowing the car is NOT a modern luxury ride, but rather a refined brick.

    Doc
    FFR3712K (MKII) in Lost Wages Nevada.
    5.0 w/tubular GT-40 EFI, E303 cam, Custom 4 into 4 headers, T5, 3-Link 3.73 rear. Full F5 tubular suspension. Drop Butt mod, Dash forward mod, custom foot box air vents, custom turn signal system. 13" PBR brakes, Fiero E-Brake mod, Flaming River 18:1 rack w/ F5 bump steer kit on Breeze bushings. 17" Chrome Cobra "R's" w/ 275 fronts and 315 rears. MKIV seats. FORD Royal Blue w/ Arctic White stripes.

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by mike223 View Post
    People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one.
    So . . . nobody should buy a completed Cobra? Have you told all the buyers of finished FFR cars, or Superformance, or Backdraft? Think again.
    818S/C : Chassis #25 with 06 WRX 2.5 turbo, ABS, cruise, PS, A/C, Apple CarPlay, rear camera, power windows & locks, leather & other complexities.
    Mk3 Roadster #6228 4.6L, T45, IRS, PS, PB, ABS, Cruise, Koni's, 17" Halibrands, red w/ silver - 9K miles then sold @ Barrett-Jackson Jan 2011 (got back cash spent).

  21. #21
    PLATNUM Supporting Member
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    One thing I would like to reiterate is that what I posted is not always the case. See my last sentence. It did happen to 3 cars I have sold. I wanted to aid anyone selling their kit car in a small way from what I experienced. No 2 people are alike (Thank God, LOL) so some will be happy and some won't. I personally like the raw power and race car like aspect of the FFR cars. But for those very used to OEM quality, fit , finish as well as weather tightness kit cars can be a shock to them. I try to explain this up front and refused to sell to customers that wanted one of these as a daily driver, My choice. In my opinion these are really great big boy toys that are a ton of fun the drive .

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by mike223 View Post
    People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one.
    Yea, looking back at this thread I don't agree with this statement either. Not at all. There are about 100 members in our local club. Factory Five is well represented. Some built, some bought. Lots of other brands as well, e.g. Superformance, etc. But I wouldn't say that those who bought theirs versus building are any less happy owners. Certainly there's a lot of pride in owning and driving something you build. But it's not for everyone. Building one of these isn't only about skill (although it helps...). Some don't have the time, patience, tools, location, or would just rather drive than build.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
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  23. #23


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    Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
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    Piling on...some of the owners who I've built for as well as folks I know who purchased completed cars (FFR, BDR, SPF) are more enthusiastic and drive more than many of the guys I've met who built their own. It comes back to Tom's original point about expectations.

    Jeff

  24. #24
    Out Drivin' Gumball's Avatar
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    I toyed with the thought of selling mine this past summer, but came to the realization that I couldn't do it... at least not as long as I'm able to maintain and drive it. Maybe someday, when I'm too old to do anything other than look at it, but even then, it'll still be a great thing to just have around.

    As for build -vs- bought, I don't think long-term satisfaction with these types of cars (Cobra replicas don't have the monopoly on being raw expressions of automotive art that have little real-world utility), is related to the owner's building or maintaining skills, but rather expectations and resources. If someone buys into any car thinking it's something that it's not, they will likely fall out of love with it quickly and move to the next bauble. Ditto someone who doesn't have either the ability, tools, or an available mechanic to maintain it - cars like this usually need a bit more fussing to keep running or to keep running right. I've seen many people get excited about jumping into the old car hobby, only to become frustrated by the time, expense, and often unreliability that their newfound toy represents. Again, those types tend to move on to the next hobby quickly.

    All that said, some of the most rabid and committed Cobra replica owners are guys I know who have bought there car already assembled - in fact they have lots more time behind the wheel than me in most cases, because while I was in the garage putting mine together, they were out driving!!!
    Later,
    Chris

    "There are no more monsters to fear, and so, we have to build our own."
    Mk3.1 #7074

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by mike223 View Post
    People who lack the skills to build one are generally not likely to be happy owning one.
    Quote Originally Posted by AZPete View Post
    So . . . nobody should buy a completed Cobra? Have you told all the buyers of finished FFR cars, or Superformance, or Backdraft? Think again.
    No, that's not what I said.

    It's just an observation that the unhappiest Cobra / replica / 69 Camaro / etc owners I've observed have been people who (often completely) neglected to develop any mechanical skills over the years and bought something they did not essentially understand and [could not maintain / could not find someone to maintain] to their satisfaction (unrealistic expectations - often on multiple levels).

    Much like Gumball said here (but shorter):

    Quote Originally Posted by Gumball View Post

    If someone buys into any car thinking it's something that it's not, they will likely fall out of love with it quickly and move to the next bauble. Ditto someone who doesn't have either the ability, tools, or an available mechanic to maintain it - cars like this usually need a bit more fussing to keep running or to keep running right. I've seen many people get excited about jumping into the old car hobby, only to become frustrated by the time, expense, and often unreliability that their newfound toy represents. Again, those types tend to move on to the next hobby quickly.
    Last edited by mike223; 01-11-2018 at 03:32 PM.

  26. #26
    Have to agree with Wallace, Gumball, and others that iterate that even if you may not have the complete skill set to build the car from soup to nuts, with fabrication and modification along the way, one can still thoroughly enjoy a hand build race machine for what it is. I am older and have known and driven older muscle cars without all the modern doodads that most ordinary folks can't seem to do without, and I cherish the interaction between man and machine at the most basic level. These are not toys (to some maybe) to be trifled with, these are unforgiving brutes that require you to pay attention and respect physics. I have never owned a vehicle with an automatic trans, and my wife learned on various manual things so even of I am not able to do a complete build, we will have a vehicle that I am sure I can maintain, and I feel when something is amiss I can repair it or get it repaired.
    Not everyone who desires and obtains a hand built presumes a cushy stereo filled ride. Some want to wrestle a bit with the metal to get it down the road. Just my $.02...

  27. #27
    Out Drivin' Gumball's Avatar
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    I gotta say, though, that we've all seen those "should I buy it" threads and either thought to ourselves (or actually responded) that the person asking should just go by a Corvette.

    /sarcasm
    Later,
    Chris

    "There are no more monsters to fear, and so, we have to build our own."
    Mk3.1 #7074

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Gumball View Post
    I gotta say, though, that we've all seen those "should I buy it" threads and either thought to ourselves (or actually responded) that the person asking should just go by a Corvette.

    /sarcasm
    That's pretty much it.


    Maybe add to / or grade this quiz:


    Which best describes you?

    1- I take my vehicles to the quick-lube because I'm afraid I'll screw something up on the oil change.

    2- I take my cars to the quick-lube because I don't want to get my hands dirty.

    3- I change my own oil because the thought of paying a teenager to touch any of my drain plugs with an impact enrages me.


    Just a thought...

  29. #29
    How about #4- I change my own oil because I KNOW it's done right...

  30. #30
    Senior Member cgundermann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SerpantFL View Post
    How about #4- I change my own oil because I KNOW it's done right...
    Exactly!
    MK4 Basic Kit #7404, 347 EFI - Pro M Racing ECM, 30# injectors, 70 mm throttle body, 80 mm MAF, Edelbrock Performer aluminum heads & RPM II intake, all new G-Force T5, 3:55 gears, Pro 5.0 shifter, 3-link, carbon fiber dash/custom Speedhut gauges and paint by Da Bat.

  31. #31
    #4: (I'm so sick that) I think it's fun.
    818S/C : Chassis #25 with 06 WRX 2.5 turbo, ABS, cruise, PS, A/C, Apple CarPlay, rear camera, power windows & locks, leather & other complexities.
    Mk3 Roadster #6228 4.6L, T45, IRS, PS, PB, ABS, Cruise, Koni's, 17" Halibrands, red w/ silver - 9K miles then sold @ Barrett-Jackson Jan 2011 (got back cash spent).

  32. #32
    I like it...

    Which best describes you?

    1- I take my vehicles to the quick-lube because I'm afraid I'll screw something up on the oil change.

    2- I take my cars to the quick-lube because I don't want to get my hands dirty.

    3- I change my own oil because the thought of paying a millennial to impact / cross thread / f__k up any of my drain plugs or oil pans enrages me.

    4- I change my own oil so I KNOW it's done right.

    5- I'm so sick I think changing oil is fun.

  33. #33

  34. #34
    Definitely #3.
    That and it's a lot cheaper to change it myself.
    I was once "too busy" and went to a crappy quick lube, I learned my lesson when they let the air out of my tires on one side and removed and lost my belly pan.
    My wife once thought I was "too busy" to change her car's oil and she learned her lesson when they left the drain plug loose and all the oil poured out onto the road as she drove away. Thankfully she only got a few blocks before the warning light came on and she went back and made them correct their mistake.

    As for the original topic, I would totally buy a built car with the expectation that I can drive it hard because it has a good power to weight ratio and it can't be any more annoying than my poorly chosen modifications modern car that rumbles and drones and vibrates and smells like bad exhaust but drives hard and corners well. I would totally drive a race car as a daily driver, I don't care how uncomfortable it is when I can enjoy the thrill of accelerating like a mad man every time I want.

  35. #35
    Lots of good comments here. I have often wondered how many buiders have not had to opportunity to test ride or drive a completed kit. I have a frind that gave me a ride along, and also was able to briefly drive a completed roadster.

    Also, I am fortunate to have owned and driven a few Sunbeams, one was a Tiger, a couple Fiats and a coupl Alfa Romeos. Many of my decisions were based on the driving experince of the Sunbeam Tiger that I owned, No power steering, no power brakes, but did have hyd clutch.

    So, I decided early on to put PS, PB, and hyd clutch in form the start.

    Another friend of mine recently boaght a Nice MGB-GT with a GM v-6 sight unseen and was surprised about he steering effort, especially at slow speeds. I am quite happy with my build, and would do it again the same way. I also kept in mind the issues for resale and added a heater and windshield wipers, for that potential in the future.20171121_104302.jpg20171121_104226.jpg
    Last edited by mcwho; 02-15-2018 at 01:53 PM. Reason: add pic
    Baghdad Bob

    Complete Kit ordered Feb 2009, Delivered July 2010, serial @ 7287, Power Brakes, Power Steering w HEIDTS Valve, Hydralic clutch, 15" Wheels, BFG Tires, 331 stroker w Edelbrock Performer RPM Heads, Edelbrock Performer Air Gap Intake and Quick Fuel 650 carb. IRS w 3.27, TKO-600.

  36. #36
    I never drove or even sat in a completed kit before purchase. I lusted for a replica Cobra for 25 years and followed the FF forums for about ten years, so I had a reasonable understanding of what I was taking on.

    My first car was a tired '67 Firebird HO with manual drum brakes, manual steering, manual windows, and cherry bomb mufflers. I loved it, but it was pretty much a pile of crap compared to my 2004 V. The low-speed steering effort with the '67 led me to install power steering on the larger-tire Cobra. Braking effort was never really a problem in the 'bird, I just hated the drum brakes' tendency to pull side-to-side under heavy braking. Inadvertent lane changes coming down from freeway speed suck! Manual discs should be fine for me on the Cobra, maybe with some tweaks to pad material.

    I'm prepared to be thrilled, scared, and overwhelmed when I start driving the car. It's going to be a process and I can't wait to get started.
    Mk4 #8861 Complete kit. Forte: 2016 Coyote, engine cover, alternator, engine control kit, clutch fork and bolts, bellhousing, Moroso oil pan, TKO600, midshifter, 3.55 3-link axle, 190lph fuel pump and regulator, air inlet and filter. Breeze: battery forward, radiator shroud and mounts.

    Delivered: 27 April 2016, Roller: 12 January 2018, Engine install: 13 January 2018

  37. #37
    Mcwho, Very sharp MK. For my .02, that nails the subtle look right on the mark.(pun intended). Would you know if instead of two separate roll bars would one that runs across from the outer mounts with 2 rear supports work?

  38. #38
    Administrator David Hodgkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SerpantFL View Post
    .../Would you know if instead of two separate roll bars would one that runs across from the outer mounts with 2 rear supports work?
    Like this?




    FFR 5369 Pin Drive, IRS, Trigos, Torsen, Wilwoods, FMS BOSS 302 "B" cam , Mass-flo. CA SB100 (SPCN) Registered
    Delivered 4/23/06. "Finished" 4/2012 (still not done!)


  39. #39
    Just wanted to say this is a great thread,

    I'm turning this over in my mind now... I do 95% of my own work on my truck (other newer car is warranty). But I do my own work because it saves an ungodly amount of money and is a fun hobby.

    I think I'd enjoy owning a car I built myself and the technical challenge appeals to me. I have limited interest in racing, more the building and technical mastery...

    But I'm still turning the idea around in my head, time vs. cost vs. experience.

    I may build something just to wrap my head around it with the intention of selling and then making the long term decision... I'll probably go to the build school next year for the hell of it

    Thanks for everyone's experiences!

    Gary

  40. #40
    David, Exactly. Very nice vehicle. The forum never fails to please and inspire. Thanks...

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