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Thread: Bob's Arizona Gen 3 Coupe Build Thread

  1. #41
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    Forum Build Thread Update 4 Sept-5-2019 - 2

    Still looking back to Fall of 2018, here’s the parts for the Ford Mustang GT Rear Brakes.
    Calipers painted Caliper Black Paint and the steel fabricated mounting parts supplied by FFR are powder coat painted.







    Assembled onto the chassis are the front and rear suspensions, IRS and brake discs





    After planning on a totally custom single pipe per side header-sidepipe exhaust system with cats, I jumped at the chance and took a leap of faith with Bob Boig and bought this set of virtually pre-release very early production set of Boig QuietPipes for the Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe. They look great after receiving them, but, of course it’ll be many months before I would mount them in any form. I plan on having then Cerekote Ceramic coated in Glacier Silver, which looks like a polished aluminum.



    An early positioning trial

    Last edited by Bob Brandle; 09-04-2019 at 04:49 PM.

  2. #42
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    Forum Build Thread Update 6 Sept-4-2019 - 3

    Status during the Winter of 2018-2019.
    With the planned use of FFR Halibrand Replica wheel in sizes 18”x 7” and 11” with 275 and 315 tires, I decided to buy and install 1.00” thick rear wheel spacers, Eibach 90.4.25.010.3 Pro-Spacer Wheel Spacer Kit, 25mm (1 inch).














    Regarding fuel lines, I went with larger 3/8” diameter stainless steel lines (supply & return) recommended by EdwardB. This also includes upgraded Pro-M Racing High Flow Fuel Pump Hanger for 1986 – 1997 Mustangs and the Walbro GSS340 255LPH pump with this hanger. Aeroquip SS hose and connector fittings were used, as well as Ham-Let Valves and Fittings, Let-Lok compression tube fitting connectors for the 3/8” pipes, an inline Trick Flow TFS-23006 fuel filter located just in front of the fuel tank and a Breeze 17087 Switch and Big Bore Check Valve is installed in the fuel tank.


  3. #43
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    Forum Build Thread Update 7 Sept-4-2019 – 4

    Winter of 2019 the suspension installations, including sway bars and E-brake lines have long been installed, but here’s some photos.








    Spring of 2019, sheet metal fitting and rivet drilling and customizations were the tasks.








  4. #44
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    Forum Build Thread Update 8 Sept-4-2019 – 5

    Spring 2019 Sheet metal customizations.
    I fabricated a custom storage bin below the rear hatch-back deck in the void above the fuel tank. Bi-folding covers mounted with SS piano hinges.









    I recently purchased for the Tremec T56, a Hurst shift lever (6in. No. 5387201) and a 6-Speed shift knob with the correct pattern, a Shelby GT500 unit. I guess the color with dual white stripes gives away the basic exterior paint I’m planning for this Coupe. But what exact hue/paint?? TBD.



    To my surprise, I discovered that this shift knob’s internal mounting thread and the shift lever’s external mounting thread were not compatible. I had assumed there was greater industry standardization than there apparently is.
    The lever’s thread size is significantly smaller in dia. than the shift knob’s internal threading size. I wanted to keep both items, and soon figured out a solution. I could use a dual threaded insert to join the two. What worked is an E-Z LOK 9/16-12" External Carbon Steel Self Locking Thread Insert with 3/8-16 Internal Thread Size. The 3/8-16 is the size of the shift lever threads and thus screws right on, while I had to drill out and tap, the luckily, very thick brass insert of the shift knob.


  5. #45
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    Forum Build Thread Update 9 Sept-4-2019 – 6

    Radiator shroud tunnel fitting. Although not pictured, a Breeze radiator fan shroud and Boig Cool Tubes have been bought and will be used in the build. All of this front end sheet metal will be satin black powder coated similar to the chassis.



    Close ups of front suspension with Mustang GT Brakes, painted in Brake Caliper black paint.
    Note that I have recently reversed the mounting orientation of the pivot clamps so that the grease fitting faces up. Thank you EdwardB for spotting that.








  6. #46
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    Forum Build Thread Update 10 Sept-4-2019 – 7

    Access panels fabricated for the tops of Passenger and Driver footboxes.
    I decided to make the split between permanently riveted rear section and the removable front section a bit further to the rear than most I’ve seen. I figure that the purpose of the removable panels is for access to inside of the footboxes (AC System and the Foot Pedal and Fuse box/wiring and that extra open space works better for me. Note that I have an L-bracket that spans the area where the two panels meet. This adds support and the ability to add sealing material.
    8-32 riv-nuts were used with 8-32 x 1/2” SS button head bolts and washers.








    Bought the tires and had them mounted, BF Goodrich g-Force Rival S in 275/35x18 and 315/30x18, because it’s about time to have a roller, etc.




  7. #47
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    Forum Build Thread Update 11 Sept-4-2019 – 8

    Getting to the roller stage












  8. #48
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    Forum Build Thread Update 12 Sept-4-2019 – 9

    Custom Dashboard
    I’ve been thinking of what “my” car’s dashboard might look like since I first was attracted to the Gen 3 type 65/Daytona Coupe literally a few months after its SEMA introduction. Now it will really be MY Dashboard, quite cool.
    This ability to actually design elements of a car, that you’re then building, is certainly one of the things I’ve enjoyed most during my Factory Five journey.

    For the past 2-1/2 years I’ve been scouring the Factory Five Forums and the internet for dashboard and interior ideas and images. No, I’m not going to create a wildly custom off the wall dashboard, but one that I hope blends period correct aspects with some modernization into a functional and pleasing dashboard (and interior). One does spend half or more of your time with your Factory Five car on the inside, looking at that dash, interior, and oh yeah, also the road ahead.

    I’ll admit that I’ve seen some great ideas along the way, mostly on the FFR Forums and I’ll use some of what I saw and also hopefully introduce some unique custom ideas too.
    I’ve decided that my dashboard will have nine gauges: Speedo & Tach, Water & Oil Temps, Oil Pressure, Electrics, Clock and a multipurpose 4-indicator gauge. I want superior visibility of all of them. Luckily the Gen 3 Coupe redesigned from the Gen 2 vastly improves the location relationship between the steering wheel and Speedo & Tach. They can now be properly seen! Bravo FFR!

    I decided that living and driving in HOT Arizona, air conditioning is mandatory for 5 months of the year, so the car and dash had to accommodate AC. I’ve loved the look of the round Audi 2000-2006 TT A/C vents so have bought a set of 4 used units off e-Bay. Luckily for me, their condition and quality is almost like new.

    I decided I like the silver on black with red indicator looks, especially when mounted on a black dash/interior of the AutoMeter Pro-Comp Ultra-Lite gauges offered by FFR and functionality for me is OK.

    I’ve discovered the New Vintage USA (NVU) Multi-Indicator Gauge which has a blacked out face when not lite and shows turn signals, high beam and emergency flasher lighting when working. Compact and all in one.

    Switches will be grouped together on a separate panel below the main dash panel. Specifics TBD, but the usual switches/controls are obvious.

    I’m planning on PBS-I system from Digital Guard Dawg, wireless & push button controls for ignition control/start-stop and to add a bit of car security given that the doors won’t likely have locks on them.

    Given everything that I want to place on the dash, I’ve designed a full cabin width dash that’s wider than the FFR supplied dash. I want the dashboard to be removable, but quickness is unnecessary, i.e., Not pit-stop friendly. I’ve designed a dashboard that makes use of the FFR supplied aluminum dashboard that bends 90 degrees forward to become the dash top under the windscreen. My dash is a panel that will fasten onto the front of the FFR dashboard and be removable from it.

    My entire dash is not yet designed though most is already fabricated. Here’s some snapshots into my design and the actual dashboard:

    Starting with the FFR supplied aluminum dash panels.



    Here are my gauges:



    The Audi 2000-2006 TT A/C Vents:





    Add in the 3rd and 4th Audi TT A/C Vents and the 9 Gauges.
    You can’t image how many versions of arrangements over many months I went thru to get to this final arrangement. I started designing everything using Photoshop on my PC. Real work mockups much later.
    Thanks to Forcefed/Curvey Road Gen 3 Coupe for his great looking Gen 3 Coupe dash, interior and some inspirations I got from it.
    The gauges, vents and (representative) switches on the below mock up are just 1:1 prints of them.



    Steering wheel mounted to check visibility




    After verifying that the looks, function and fit of both the outside AND behind of the dash are OK, I proceeded to the actual sheet metal dash. Note that while FFR Sheet metal is 0.040” thick, my dash panel is 0.065” thick, more than 50% thicker and thus stiffer. I went with the thicker/stronger panel because of the Swiss-cheesed resulting panel of having so many gauge & vent holes. T5052 alum. was used.


  9. #49
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    Forum Build Thread Update 13 Sept-4-2019 – 10

    Drafting up the final layout and dimensions that will then be transferred to the alum. dash panel.



    Transferred onto the dash panel





    Gauges and AC Vents displayed on the panel



    Holes cut into the dash panel via hole saws and drill press. Thank you Jazzman for use of your drill press.



    Below is what remains of the original FFR supplied dash panel. It has been modified to work with my dashboard design. It will serve as part of the dashboard’s backboard support structure. The windows in this dash support structure allow the dashboard mounted gauges and vents to pass thru. The front dashboard will mount to this dash support structure as well as the chassis cross tube of the firewall.



    As can be seen below, the bottom edge of this original dashboard support structure has a stiffener in the form of an aluminum 3/8” U channel that will be riveted to the bottom angled stiffener tab.
    There are also two 1” square aluminum tube sections that attach and will be riveted to this U channel and then run forward and are to be riveted to the 1” chassis cross tube. These will increase the rigidity and strength of the bottom of the dashboard support structure, yet be out of the way for the wiring, AC ducts, etc. that will be located behind the dashboards.



  10. #50
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    Forum Build Thread Update 14 Sept-4-2019 – 11

    All 9 gauges will be slightly angled toward the driver by using angled gauge mounts.

    The 6 small AutoMeter gauges will be angled slightly left and the Speedo, Tach and NVU gauges slightly upwards towards the driver’s face.

    For the 6 small AutoMeter gauges, AutoMeter sells quite nice black beveled angle ring mounts (#2234) with aluminum square U securement brackets.

    For the large Speedo and Tach gauges AutoMeter does not offer any such angle ring mounts so I decided to make my own. I searched around and luckily found at Home Depot perfectly sized nominal 3” I.D. with thick walls black PVC plastic pipe connectors. The Speedo and Tach gauges slipped right in with very little play. With careful measuring and then even more careful hand sawing and filing I was able to cut the needed two angle ring mounts. For the NVU gauge, I was also able to locate a properly sized black PVC tube and fabricate the needed angle ring mount.



    The Gauges in their angled mounts trial mounted.







    The Audi TT A/C vents trial mounted (not angled, straight ahead)



    The gauged dash panel will have box endplates on either side that will be riveted to the gauged dash panel. Then each endplate will be secured with 10-24 bolts into riv-nuts mounted in the 1-1/2” chassis cross member at the firewall.

    I’ve trial tested all of this with just some Cleco rivets and the full set of bolts in the riv-nuts and the resulting dash structure is amazingly rock solid. It’ll be even better with all of the permanent rivets.



    Toward the very end of the build, the front dash panel, switches & controls panel, transmission tunnel panels and door panels will be black “leatherette” covered with colored accent stitching added by a professional upholsterer. The top of the dash will receive some special styling (TBD) and be covered in glued on black Alcantara, which offers better glare and reflection management off the windshield and which holds up better in the hot and bright Arizona weather than glued on leather/leatherette

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  12. #51
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    Forum Build Thread Update 15 Sept-4-2019 – 12

    This is my seat and harness:
    Corbeau Evolution X with fixed back and adjustable lumbar support
    Schroth Rallye Cross boltv2 4-Point harness in blue.

    I chose the Schroth Rallye harness due to its advanced 4-point system that acts like a 5-point system in severe decelerations (aka, crash) and the very easy ingress, egress and single buckle-up. Essentially there are two loops that one places the arms thru then a single central buckle. No four or five separate loose straps to insert into a common buckle.
    I’m not planning to do any actual track racing with the Coupe, just some light track days.

    ALERT: My brand new FFR full kit order supplied Simpson Harnesses (red) are now surplus for me. If anyone wants them cheap to replace your worn out and dirty old harnesses, send me a PM with an offer.





    EdwardB who’s effectively well over a full year ahead of me in his Gen 3 Coupe build, previously selected, test fit and purchased the Corbeau Evolution X seats while I had already been eying them back in the Fall of 2017. Thank you Paul for verifying they fit and work well. I think were about the same body size so that aspect helps too, as well as having wives that makes it a good idea for us to have comfortable seats in the Coupe.

    Thank you also for provide such great mounting instructions, photos of your location templates and seat mounts that can be seen below along with the seat mounts in my car. I took a flyer and trusted those so much that after careful and close examination I directly transferred your mounts and their bolt locations to my car….and with a leap of faith, drilled.

    Happily, it all worked out and my seats fit great. The one thing I had to do was slightly bend out the two FFR Coupe floor weld-mounted seat harness attachment tabs. The distance between the tabs was exactly the same 17” width of the seat frame at the down low points where they contacted. I spread each tab 3/8” measured at their tops and now have clearance for seat track movement and gained a full inch in additional rearward seat movement.


    The mounting process was first with the floor sheet metal in place and the 4x holes in each seat mount drilled. For both seat mounts, there were three holes into the under seat welded on steel chassis seat pan and a fourth hole into a chassis frame member.

    Initial bolt in verification installation of my seats was then with the sheet metal remove, due to it being out of powder coat painting. I was certainly convenient to have the sheet metal removed for this verification fitment.

    Size 3/8-16 SS button head bolts were threaded into weld-nuts that were positioned on top of the seat mounts. With all bolts tightened in their weld-nuts I examined the seat mounts and their ability to slide, etc. After removing everything from the car, I re-assembled the weld-nuts to the frame and secured them tight with the button head screws. I then proceeded to drill the holes thru just for the rivet, 2 per Weld-nut and riveted the weld-nuts to the frame with the heads on the underside. I didn’t want any chance for the longish cut off ends to interfere with flat mounting of the seat mounts against the floor.

    The seats and seat mounts were then bolted together with the 4x bolts provided with the seats.

    I noticed that there were 4 bolts used to mount the seat mount frame and seat slider mechanisms together and the heads of the bolts used were pronounced bumps on the otherwise flat and smooth seat mount frame bottoms. I decided that spacers were needed under the seat mounts to make sure that there was solid end to end metal contact when the seats were secured in the car. I selected some on hand extra washers to use, 0.20” thk. x 1.0” dia. hardened steel washers

    Then the seat + mount was positioned into the car, washers positioned and everything bolted in place for the first time. Success! Secure, solid and well positioned.

    And, Yes, now it is easier to get in and out of the car.

    Of course the seats will come out fairly soon and especially when the sheet metal is permanently installed, etc.







    Last edited by Bob Brandle; 09-04-2019 at 06:33 PM.

  13. #52
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    Forum Build Thread Update 16 Sept-4-2019 – 13

    After the pedal box and pedals were installed, a straight forward task, next up was the supplied Mustang drive-by-wire accelerator pedal assembly installation, a NOT Very Straight Forward Task.

    The supplied Mustang Accel. Pedal assemble is designed and built for the Mustang which has different geometry and structure in the firewall, pedal box and steering shaft area. A “normal” mounting place for the Mustang Accelerator Pedal Assembly would interfere with the steering shaft. Since the steering shaft cannot be relocated or even really modified, the Mustang Accel. Pedal Assy. needs to be both modified and creatively located and secured.

    There are a number ways to accomplish all of this, including by using the FFR supplied Lokar Accel Pedal Assembly and FFR’s instructions. Not everyone does that and there are some innovative alternative solutions.

    I’ve gone my own unique way and hopefully it works out well.

    First off, I’ve long admired exotic “racy” looking pedals often in such cars as Porsche, Ferrari, etc., where the all three pedals pads are of the same design/look and they have that bare metal techno-drilled look.

    The supplied Wilwood pedal pads are perfect, but there are only two of them, leaving the accelerator pedal pad out in the cold.

    But, many months ago, I found in the FFR Forum, Michael Craven’s accelerator Pedal Pad Mod.

    Michael bought two spare Wilwood pedal pads (Wilwood P/N 330-11280) of the same design used on the Gen 3 Coupe’s Wilwood brake and clutch pedals.

    His mod. is to saw off a horizontal portion of each pedal pad to remove one of the five rows of decorative drill holes. The two pedal pads are butt joined together when they’re mount onto a modified Mustang digital accelerator pedal, resulting in a more traditional longish accelerator pedal pad. Easy said, more difficult to achieve, but doable.

    I like Michael’s mod and have implemented that for my Accel. Pedal






    Next up was how I decided to and did modify the Mustang Accel. Pedal Assembly and mount it into the Pedal Box/Foot box.

    After examining the pedal arrangements of a few of my cars and a few others, examining what FFR has presented us in their design recommendation, reading so many installs in the FFR Forums and thinking about it all, I came to a few conclusions and preferences;

    To me, I prefer an Accel Pedal/Pad that is fairly close to the alignment of the other two pedals in height, spacing and forward/backward relationships.

    The Mustang Accel Pedal Assy. when quick positioned on the FFR built in mounting bracket places the Accel Pedal far to forward in the footbox for my liking. I don’t want to have to lift my right foot several inches to be even with the brake pedal. I’d prefer them to be much more in the same plane.

    I would also prefer the top of the Accel. Pedal Pad to be close to or in alignment with the top of the pads of the other two pedals.

    Time will tell if this will work out when I drive the car, but here we go.

    So I set out to try accomplish these two locating desires PLUS also make sure the top & left side of the Mustang Accel. Pedal Assembly Clear the Steering Shaft, PLUS have enough clearance space on the right to adequately clear the footbox sheet metal panel (both pedal and driver’s foot placed on the pedal pad, PLUS be spaced far enough away from the Brake Pedal to make for proper driving.

    Part of the solution is the need to make the Accel Pedal Assembly narrower to fit in the available space between the brake pedal and the engine/transmission firewall on the right. I ended up sawing completely off 2 of the 3 mounting tabs of the Accel Pedal Assembly and cut off part of the mount of the 3rd, the lower mount.

    The top 2 mounting pads, totally removed, will be replaced by two new bolt hole locations closer in on the Accel Pedal Assembly.

    Be careful to not saw off or remove too much webbing of the Pedal assembly, those are strength and support design points.



    My design includes a 1” thick x 6” long x 2-1/2” wide aluminum spacer block that the cut down Accel Pedal assembly will be mounted onto via 3 bolts.

    The use of a 1” thick spacer block effectively positions the Accel Pedal Assy. Towards the driver by that 1” and can position the Accel Pedal Pad closer to in-line with the brake and clutch pedal pads.

    The 2-1/2” width and 6” height of the spacer block effectively matches the width and height of the reduced size of the Accel Pedal Assembly.

    Below you can see the reduced size and modified shape of the Accel. Pedal Assy. and how it’s mounted onto the Alum. Spacer Block. You can see a new more “tucked in” upper left side bolt location and you can see that the lower left reduced size mounting tab is still in use.



    Below you can see the location of the third mounting bolt tucked into the webbing on the upper right side of the Accel Pedal Assy.

    Yes, both of these two upper mounting points are not as far out (less mechanical advantage) as the originally designed Accel Pedal Assy. has them, but I believe it will be secured enough. That plastic housing and webbing should be fairly strong and stiff.



    The precise location and angling of this block and accel. pedal assy onto the FFR chassis welded on mounting bracket has to be determined by the builder.

    Care needs to be done to have the accel pedal assy’s top mounted electrical connector clear both the steering shaft above and brake pedal lever to the left, as seen below.

    Note in these photos the angled mounting of both the aluminum mounting block and accelerator pedal assembly. This is to have both clear the right side from the engine tunnel firewall and to position the electrical connection at the upper left of the accel. pedal assy to the left of the steering shalf.



    Last edited by Bob Brandle; 09-04-2019 at 06:35 PM.

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  15. #53
    Senior Member q4stix's Avatar
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    I may have missed this in the build manual or in your thread, but why choose the rear brake setup you have? It looks like the calipers are stock 2015+ IRS but the brackets are to make them smaller diameter which I didn't think was necessary with the 18" wheels. Sorry if this was covered before!
    Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe builder

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    Forum Build Thread Update 17 Sept-4-2019 – 14

    Continuing with the Accelerator Pedal Assembly mods and mounting;

    Here’s some side views of the mounted Accel. Pedal Assy. (ignore the green tape)

    Note that I’ve located the Accel. Pedal Assy. as high as I could in order to also raise up the bottom of the Accel. Pedal Arm and the mounting area for the pad and maintain as long an arm as possible for mechanical advantage during operation of the Accelerator Pedal.

    I cut/machined a 45 degree angle at the top mounting surface corner of the Accel. Pedal Assy. plastic in order for it to clear the steering shaft. I also angle cut back the alum. Spacer block, but that might not really have been necessary in the final design.

    The modifications to this block are an untold story unto itself, of initial design and then some necessary trial and error fitment cuts, grinding and filing. Knowing now what the final design solution is, I could make a “pretty” final version, but, I’m not in production and sales. For me, this is good enough, should be structurally OK and buried deep in the footbox. I may paint it black though (Eastwood Extreme Chassis Satin Black via spray can).





    Below is a view of the back side (actually the front side in overall car orientation) and how I mounted some things.

    The Alum. Spacer Block and then the Accel. Pedal Assembly are mounted this way:

    My design intent was that all of this could be removed, if necessary, in a finished car without removing any sheet metal.

    Three riv-nuts are mounted into the FFR welded on Accel. Pedal bracket. Then three flat head or countersunk-head bolts mount the alum spacer block to the welded on bracket. Note: These three bolts are separate from and must not interfere with the three mounting hole locations of the Accel. Pedal Assy.

    The bottom bolt of the three Accel. Pedal Assy. bolts is threaded into a tapped hole in the aluminum block.

    The other two/top bolts makes use of reversed riv-nuts mounted in a notched out area at the top of the alum spacer block. These riv-nuts are tightly press fit inserted with glue added since the crush securement process normally used for riv-nuts won’t work completely to secure them or hold them in place when the bolt is removed. Essentially these riv-nuts are like a nut that is located in a recessed hole and glued in place. So far, I can get full tightening of the bolts with these riv-nuts.

    You can see one such rivet-nut at the left or near corner. Yes, this is kind of bizarre assembly, but I found it quite difficult to get all of this aligned in such a confined foot box space.



    The remaining design, fabrication and mounting of the Mod. Accel. Pedal Pads is underway.

  17. #55
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    q4stix,
    I really just ordered from FFR the stock Mustang GT brakes, 4 corners, figuring that this 1,000+ lbs. or lighter car than the Mustang GT would make them more than adequate for my intentions.
    I would think that the rear calipers and their mounting would be keyed in on the specific disc disk size and their proper relationship to the calipers and not at all the diameter of the wheel, which being 18" have plenty of room.

    Perhaps Wilwood calipers and supplied discs are larger in diameter, but that's probably what one pays for, etc.

    One more thing is that I ordered 18" FFR Halibrand Replica wheels in my original Full Kit order and would think that Factory five would ship the correct size "stock" Mustang GT brakes to me. To me they all seem to fit OK.

  18. #56
    Senior Member q4stix's Avatar
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    Ahh, I looked at the pictures and thought the calipers were ground going over the rotors and it was the 11.65" package they offered. I was thinking it was that so you could fit it in a smaller wheel. I realize the calipers would need to match rotor size and caliper position.

    Looking at the Factory Five images, I think it's mostly due to an interference with the coils overs if they're left in the stock Mustang position (bolting the calipers to the two lugs on the knuckles where the brackets now have to mount). Since I'm changing that part on my build I didn't even look to see if it varied from the Mustang GT setup.
    Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe builder

  19. #57
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    Bob, these are super useful posts and photos. Thanks for taking the time to upload all this.

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    Forum Build Thread Update 18 Sept-8-2019

    Custom Accelerator Pedal Assembly Continued:
    This is the Mounting & Spacer Bar for the Accelerator Pedal Assembly.

    Dimensionally it is nominally 6” x 2.5” x 1.0”

    The bar is secured to the chassis Accel. Pedal Assy. welded on Bracket by three -20 Stainless Steel Hex Flat Head Screws that are screwed into -20 Rivet-Nuts that are affixed into the chassis’ welded on Pedal Assy. Bracket. Blue Loctite is used.

    The angled cuts are for clearances but might not be totally necessary as seen. I just didn’t want to go back and fabricate this piece all over again since it is hand sawed, filed and drilled.




    The two cut down Wilwood Pedal Pads are secured to the fabricated aluminum mounting plate and it’s tapped holes via 4 each 10-24 Stainless Steel flat head screws (1/2” long and ” long). Torx or Hex screws are preferred.

    The location of the mounting plate and 2 butt joined pedal pads are designed to have the top edge of the top pedal pad be roughly in line with the tops of the similar brake and clutch pedal pads and with the same mounted orientation angle. The mounting plate is secured to the black plastic Accel. Pedal Arm with three 10-24 Stainless Steel Button Head screws, nuts and blue Loctite




    The exact location of the three mounting plate holes and their screws were carefully chosen to be located at strategic or advantageous locations inside the web structure of the Accel.
    Pedal Leg as seen below.
    Washers would have been nice to use, but there simply wasn’t space for them.




    By total coincidence, and taken advantage of, the location of these three button head screws placed them directly under the domed area of the pedal pads.
    This allowed button head screws to be used instead of countersunk flat head screws.




    The Pedal Mounting Plate was spray painted Eastwood Chassis Extreme Satin Black.
    With it mounted to the Accel Pedal Arm, the excess length of the plastic Arm was cut off flush.




    Mounting everything into the car:
    1. The Accel. Pedal Assy. Spacer Bar to the chassis mounting bracket
    2. The Ford Mustang GT Accelerator Pedal Assembly to the Spacer Bar
    3. The Pedal Pad Mounting Plate to the Accelerator Pedal Assy. Arm
    4. The top cut down Pedal Pad to the Pedal Pad Mounting Plate
    5. The bottom cut down Pedal Pad to the Pedal Pad Mounting Plate

    For now, Blue Loctite was Not used to secure the Pedal Pads to the Mounting Plate, but was used for all other screws since this is desired to be a long term installation.






    Checking out the driving feet on the pedals. Spacing looks OK and the feel seems OK.
    Still need the floor matting, carpeting and sheet metal panels installed for a better check.
    Certainly wide and knobby soled shoes or sneakers are not advised. Whether narrower real Driving or Racing shoes are needed or preferred will have to wait for actual driving.




    I guess that's it for now on the Accelerator Pedal Assembly Installation, until I install the painted sheet metal, start hooking up the wiring, install padding and carpeting and start the engine, as I continue with the marathon.

    Bob
    Last edited by Bob Brandle; 09-09-2019 at 04:57 PM.

  21. #59
    Junior Member
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    Excellent level of detail, Bob! Thanks. I'm enjoying reading stuff like this while I'm waiting for my marathon to begin. FFR says my coupe will be done 9/21/19. Tick tock...

  22. #60
    Senior Member
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    Looks great, like the dash layout. One item to check, put the AC/heater unit in and look at how the ducts fit behind the dash. There is not much room and I ended up cutting holes in the dash end plate to fit the hoses.
    David W
    Mkll 4874 built in 2004
    Gen 3 coupe #16 registered 2018 painted 2019

  23. #61
    Senior Member
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    I think it looks great as well. Another thing to check is your switch layout and do you have enough room behind your lower dash piece assuming this is where you locate them. The Headlight switch, in particular, can be challenging.
    Gen 3 Coupe, Gen 2 Coyote, Wilwoods, IRS, Power Steering, AC JDAVIS500 Build Thread

  24. #62
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    David,
    Thanks for the dash complement and also for the heads up regarding the A/C hose plumbing. Yes, there will be a need for 4 main and two additional "defogger" outlets to be fed AC air flow. Though since here in Arizona defogging is seldom a problem only a small amount of air needs to go there.
    See my below response to jdavis500 and the composite photo that I'll post explaining a few design ideas I have.

  25. #63
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    jdavis500,
    Thanks also for the dash complement and switches heads up.
    I believe that since I'm planning on mounting the switches & controls on the added angled panel that is outward from the dash and underlying angled transmission tunnel panel, there should be actually additional space in this, "behind the panels" area. I do realize that my switches & controls will be mounted at an angle, not in vertical line with the dash, so while the ideal design location is centered vertically on this panel, I might have to mount the switches & controls slightly higher to make adequate clearances behind them.

    Check out the below photos composite that I have put together to help explain things brought up by David Williamson and yourself -


    With the switches & controls located further away from the dash (rearward in the chassis), I believe that I can relocate downward and rearward in the chassis an inch or two, much of the wiring and electronics that Edwardb has excellently laid out in his Gen 3 Coupe. With an A/C Plenum design concept by Freds, this should allow me to design and install an A/C Plenum up high on the back of the firewall, where Edwardb has bundled and grouped much of the wiring. Of course, I also have to figure in where the windshield wiper motor and linkages go.

    From the A/C Plenum, I would have "compressed" round corrugated A/C hoses connected to the plenum at 3 places that would go straight rearward to 3 of the 4 Audi A/C vents. This would theoretically allow the Dash Panel to be removed and pulled directly rearward a few inches for maintenance or repairs access. And if needed, the hoses could be disconnected from the Audi A/C Vents if the dash needs to be removed further.
    the Audi A/C vent to the left of the driver would have routed to it a more conventional A/C hose off the left end of the Plenum. Two small A/C hoses would also be routed from the A/C Plenum to the defogger vents.



    Bob

  26. #64
    Senior Member edwardb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Brandle View Post
    Of course, I also have to figure in where the windshield wiper motor and linkages go...
    Interesting to see your ideas here. I went off the reservation a little. You're going a little further. Glad my ideas and pictures have been a resource. My interior pieces are all upholstered now. Hope to have the dash all back together for the last time before the week's out. Will post an update in my build thread.

    For the wipers, unless you're doing something different, that should be the least of your worries. The wiper mounts in the body are in front of the firewall and the mechanism fits under there pretty easily. Shouldn't interfere with anything on the cockpit side of the firewall.
    Last edited by edwardb; 09-10-2019 at 07:26 PM.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread and Video
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  27. #65
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    cool idea, seems like everybody takes new ideas and adds to them resulting in better cara.
    David W
    Mkll 4874 built in 2004
    Gen 3 coupe #16 registered 2018 painted 2019

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