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Thread: Meindl Mk IV Build

  1. #161
    edwardb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteMeindl View Post
    We have a couple questions:
    - When looking at other build threads, we don't often see a frame extension sticking towards where the driver sits where you mount the pillow block that far back (as you see in the above picture). It looks like FF drilled holes for the pillow block at the far end of the bracket. Should we move the placement of the pillow block further towards the front of the car and drill some new holes or just keep it where it is? It just seems like most of the time people mount this pillow block further forward. Either way, we'll need to add a decent sized spacer to raise the pillow block enough to keep the steering shaft off of the frame - I think this is ok, right?
    - In the manual, it mentions to use threadlocker on the steering shaft but we weren't quite sure where - where do you guys use threadlocker on the steering shaft?
    A year or so ago (plus or minus) Factory Five redesigned the upper steering column mount to the longer version you have. This is the best picture I could find of the old version. Zoom in and you can see it. I'd be willing to bet that many build threads you're looking at have this older version, hence the confusion.



    Looks like the pictures in even the newest build manual are also still the older version. Although I haven't built with it, I've seen where others have reported the steering shaft hitting exactly like what's happening with yours. Many use the Russ Thompson turn signal assembly, which he has re-designed so it works with the new mount. Using it spaces the column up so it doesn't hit. If you're not using his mount, then add a spacer on each side of the bearing high enough to not interfere with the chassis.

    Probably they're talking about thread locker on the set screws on the upper and lower bearings. I wouldn't be in a hurry. You may end up with the steering shaft in and out a couple times before you're done. I always seem to.

    Edit: cv2065 posted a similar explanation at the same time as me. At least we agree.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

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  3. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
    A year or so ago (plus or minus) Factory Five redesigned the upper steering column mount to the longer version you have. This is the best picture I could find of the old version. Zoom in and you can see it. I'd be willing to bet that many build threads you're looking at have this older version, hence the confusion.



    Looks like the pictures in even the newest build manual are also still the older version. Although I haven't built with it, I've seen where others have reported the steering shaft hitting exactly like what's happening with yours. Many use the Russ Thompson turn signal assembly, which he has re-designed so it works with the new mount. Using it spaces the column up so it doesn't hit. If you're not using his mount, then add a spacer on each side of the bearing high enough to not interfere with the chassis.

    Probably they're talking about thread locker on the set screws on the upper and lower bearings. I wouldn't be in a hurry. You may end up with the steering shaft in and out a couple times before you're done. I always seem to.

    Edit: cv2065 posted a similar explanation at the same time as me. At least we agree.
    Thanks, Paul! Yeah, that all makes sense and we'll take that path. One other interesting change that seems to have happened is that the accelerator bracket has changed such that the steering shaft now goes between the 2 accelerator attachment points on the left of the pedal assembly (the shaft now passes just under the top attachment point) rather than above both attachment points which is I think how it was in the past.

    Happy new year to you and thank you for all of your help!

  4. #163
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    aluminum panels

    We've been doing a lot of drilling and cleco'ing lately - i can feel it in my arms after all that drilling! Here's a picture of the passenger side footbox:


    And the passenger side aluminum floor:


    Here's the inside of the footbox before we got all the panels in:


    We were wondering about a couple items:
    - for the outside panel of the passenger footbox, on the lower side of that panel along the edge of the panel that is parallel to the ground, do you guys rivet through that panel, the floor panel, and the round tube of the frame? Or just through the 2 aluminum panels?
    - It's ok to drill & rivet into the 2 main cylindrical tubes of the chassis, right? Such as for the aluminum floor.
    - At what point in the process do you guys think it's best to actually rivet all these footbox panels?

    Thanks for any advice you guys have!

  5. #164
    Straversi's Avatar
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    Looking good.
    Regarding the foot box and rivets, I’d try to just rivet the panels together. If you need to run some into the 2” tube it’s not a problem. I didn’t rivet into the main tubes for the floors but many do from what I have seen.

    I’d postpone riveting panels together until you can’t go any further. It’s nice to be able to take it apart if you have to get to something. When the panels are loose you can reach through the frame. Once the rivets are in you are going under and over. That’s when I understood why lifts were so popular.
    -Steve
    MK IV #8901 - Complete kit, Coyote, TKO-600, IRS. Ordered 5/23/16, Delivered 7/14/16, First Start 8/13/17, First Go-Kart 10/22/17, Registered and Completed 10/18/18. Build Thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...V-Coyote-Build Graduation Thread: https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...-Roadster-8901

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  7. #165
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    Agree with Steve's comments. Couple more. See from your pics your panels are all still raw, including the ink marking. Are you planning to finish them in some way? Paint, powder coat, Sharkhide, whatever? If so, you want to do that after drilling and fitting, but before permanently mounting them. Also, I'd recommend after drilling that you take the time to clean up the drilled holes. I see a lot of burrs and flash around your holes. That's going to get in the way of setting the rivets properly and just generally needs to be cleaned up before whatever finish you do. You can use a deburring tool, a countersink bit, or I use a large nice sharp 5/8-inch drill bit and just twist it in the hole by hand. Cleans them right up.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

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  9. #166
    Senior Member Fixit's Avatar
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    Don't know if you have compressed air available, but a pnuematic riveter will fast become your new best friend.
    John D. - Minneapolis 'Burbs

    1965 El Camino - LT-1, 4L60e, 4wh discs, SC&C susp.
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    2018 Mk4 Roadster - #9365 Build Thread

  10. #167


    Not a waxer
    Jeff Kleiner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
    ...See from your pics your panels are all still raw, including the ink marking. Are you planning to finish them in some way? Paint, powder coat, Sharkhide, whatever? If so, you want to do that after drilling and fitting, but before permanently mounting them...
    Just adding to Paul's comment...if you intend to leave them raw as many do take acetone or lacquer thinner and remove the ink markings ASAP. A thin layer of oxidation begins to build on the surface as soon as the aluminum sheets are manufactured but will not occur (at least not to the same level) over the ink---if you wait to clean the ink off the layer will be even heavier on the non-inked area and although the black markings will be gone you'll still see the less oxidized "shadow" of where it was.

    Jeff

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  12. #168
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    Thanks, Straversi! Sounds good - I'll go that route.

  13. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
    Agree with Steve's comments. Couple more. See from your pics your panels are all still raw, including the ink marking. Are you planning to finish them in some way? Paint, powder coat, Sharkhide, whatever? If so, you want to do that after drilling and fitting, but before permanently mounting them. Also, I'd recommend after drilling that you take the time to clean up the drilled holes. I see a lot of burrs and flash around your holes. That's going to get in the way of setting the rivets properly and just generally needs to be cleaned up before whatever finish you do. You can use a deburring tool, a countersink bit, or I use a large nice sharp 5/8-inch drill bit and just twist it in the hole by hand. Cleans them right up.
    Thanks, Paul! What we've done so far before permanently mounting the panels (for the few that we've riveted) has been to acetone them to get rid of the markings and then sharkhiding them. We'll do that with these panels too before we mount them for good. Thanks for the good idea around deburring the holes - i like your 5/8 drill bit idea, nice and simple and gets the job done! We'll do that to clean it up!

  14. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kleiner View Post
    Just adding to Paul's comment...if you intend to leave them raw as many do take acetone or lacquer thinner and remove the ink markings ASAP. A thin layer of oxidation begins to build on the surface as soon as the aluminum sheets are manufactured but will not occur (at least not to the same level) over the ink---if you wait to clean the ink off the layer will be even heavier on the non-inked area and although the black markings will be gone you'll still see the less oxidized "shadow" of where it was.

    Jeff
    Thanks, Jeff! I've noticed that shadow on the previous panels we've acetoned and sharkhided and didn't realize what the cause was - now I do. Thanks a lot!

  15. #171
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    Starting fuel system

    Thanks for all the good advice on the panels, guys! One final question on the panels before we move on - is it ok if some panels rise up a little past the frame? For instance here's a picture of the panel going up the vertical side of the transmission/driveshaft tunnel on the passenger side and you can see the panel extends beyond the frame. Is this ok or do you guys recommend trying to cut this down? Thanks!



    We're on to the fuel system now! Something i'm a little unsure about... We've put the vent and gasket into the fuel tank and are now looking at the fuel pickup. In the ff instructions, it says to drill out the 2 ends of the fuel pickup. The instructions, pictured below, show that you should use the exact same size drill bits to drill out each of the pickup lines - but they are quite different sizes. Is this right? Or should i use smaller drill bits for the smaller pickup.

    Here are the instructions:


    Here's a picture of the 2 lines:


    Thanks a lot! Have a good weekend, everybody!

  16. #172
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    For those bent floor pieces that are extending above the top of the transmission tunnel, no you don't want that extra material there. It will prevent the transmission tunnel cover top from mounting properly against the chassis tubes. Looks like you already have it drilled and cleco'd. I've noticed they may extend slightly and need a little trimming. But not that much. I've found you need to push the corner down at the floor level pretty firmly to get them to go down all or most of the way. Maybe try that and see if they'll go down more. Otherwise, I'd trim them. But as a last resort. My usual advice regarding the aluminum panels is they're well proven and precisely laser cut. If something doesn't fit right, check the assembly, proper overlap, etc. before cutting metal. Almost always not required. My main experience with occasional trimming (just a little...) is to clear welds so they sit flat.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

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  18. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardb View Post
    For those bent floor pieces that are extending above the top of the transmission tunnel, no you don't want that extra material there. It will prevent the transmission tunnel cover top from mounting properly against the chassis tubes. Looks like you already have it drilled and cleco'd. I've noticed they may extend slightly and need a little trimming. But not that much. I've found you need to push the corner down at the floor level pretty firmly to get them to go down all or most of the way. Maybe try that and see if they'll go down more. Otherwise, I'd trim them. But as a last resort. My usual advice regarding the aluminum panels is they're well proven and precisely laser cut. If something doesn't fit right, check the assembly, proper overlap, etc. before cutting metal. Almost always not required. My main experience with occasional trimming (just a little...) is to clear welds so they sit flat.
    Thanks, Paul! We will try to push that panel down further and see if we can get it to line up. What you said makes a lot of sense.

    Anyone have any thoughts on the drill bits for widening out those fuel intakes? Maybe it's not too big a deal what size you use?

    Thanks, guys - hope you all are having a good weekend!

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