Russ' Garage

Visit our community sponsor

Thanks Thanks:  12
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: torque wrench recommendation

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Riverside CT USA
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like

    torque wrench recommendation

    Hi guys,
    Quick tool advice question: I'm building up the tool collection to get ready for arrival of our car in a couple weeks. On Harbor Freight, I see a Pittsburgh Torque Wrench is only $20 - less than 25% of what a Husky torque wrench costs. Are people happy with the quality of the pittsburgh torque wrenches? It almost seems like too good a deal to be true so i just wanted to check with you all. Also, from reading the build manual, it looks like we probably need two different torque wrenches, one for relatively low torque and one for high torque - do people generally get 2?
    Thanks a lot for you advice!
    Pete

  2. #2
    slpro1207's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Moorpark, CA
    Posts
    261
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    3
    I have bought a lot of tools from HF that has worked out just fine. I don’t know that I would trust anything that is calibrated though. I have 2 torque wrenchs. One that goes to 100lbs and a larger one for 250lbs. Both Craftmans.
    Did not want to take chances of anything loosening at go fast time.
    Delivered 2/24/2017. Complete kit #9023,IRS, Power Steering, Leather, heater, 17" wheels, sway bar ft & rr, tremec 600 and Gordon Levy Racing SBF 427. First start and go kart 8/19/2017. Graduated 1/15/2018

  3. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  4. #3
    Seasoned Citizen NAZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    "The High Country", beautiful Flagstaff, AZ
    Posts
    888
    Post Thanks / Like
    If it doesn't come with a calibration cert showing the error over its range how do you know how accurate it is? All good quality torque wrenches can be had with calibration certs. And to maintain that accuracy it has to be calibrated on a reasonable frequency based on use.

    Yes, top of the line precision tools cost more but this is one of those areas that you get what you pay for. With tools the rule is "buy cheap = buy twice" but with a precision measuring tool unless you have a calibration gauge how do you know the reading it gives you is accurate? And if it's not accurate then what purpose does it serve?

  5. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  6. #4
    Mark Eaton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    349
    Post Thanks / Like
    Pay the extra money for the Husky. I have two of them and they are high quality. And you will need a torque wrench in inch-lbs if you are using Wilwood brakes and I think for something else but I can't remember what. Also, your front spindle Hub Nuts need to be torqued to 250 ft-lbs. you might check your local Napa store because they might be able to loan you those tools.
    MK4 #9130 , complete kit, arrived 8/10/2017.
    DART SHP 347, EFI, TKO600, IRS
    http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...n-Build-Thread

  7. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  8. #5
    Senior Member cv2065's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    561
    Post Thanks / Like
    I've got a 3/8" drive Harbor Freight and a 1/2" drive Kobalt (Lowes brand of Husky). Can't afford a Snap On. Kobalt is a little better made (it seems) than the HF but the torque readings are harder to see as they are marked into the chrome. I've compared both to the same torque number and they are pretty much the same, so I'd have to give the HF a thumbs up for accuracy.
    MKIV Roadster - Complete Kit - Delivered 7/17/18
    Build Thread: https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...V-Build-Thread

  9. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  10. #6

    Super Moderator
    Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    La Mesa, California
    Posts
    1,060
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a 1/4" and 3/8" Harbor Freight and a 1/2" Snap-On. The HF units are certainly accurate enough for car building. The only reason I have the Snap-On unit was for the ball joints.

    I think the HF ones will be fine.

    Ray
    I'm not getting gray, I'm adding chrome....

    “Under-steer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car and over-steer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car. Horsepower is how fast you hit the wall and torque is how far you take the wall with you.”
    -- Jacques Schnauzee "World Famous Racecar Driver"

    "If you can make black marks on a straight from the time you turn out of a corner until the braking point of the next turn, then you have enough horsepower."--Mark Donohue

  11. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  12. #7
    edwardb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lake Orion, Michigan
    Posts
    5,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have a couple of the H-F torque wrenches. I suspect they're OK. But to be honest I don't use them as often as the Brownline Metal Works digital one I bought several years ago. Around $100 as I recall. ACDelco makes a similar one for about the same price. Required? I don't know. But appreciate how the digital works with direct readout, light warnings, etc. A little better than the sometimes subtle "click" of the H-F wrenches. You'll need a wrench that goes as high as 250 ft-lbs for a couple things on the build. But many just use the rent a tool program at their local parts store since that high range is rarely needed.

    Something else that's a little interesting. There are a number of companies offering a digital torque adapter, similar to this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1. Home Depot has one. H-F has one. Etc. Has the ability to use a standard ratchet or breaker bar and get a torque reading. But also has the ability to be a poor man's calibration tool. I checked the H-F clickers out using this tool and they were pretty close. FWIW. Yea, I know only as accurate as that device which also isn't calibrated. But digital stuff is surprisingly accurate.
    Build 1: Mk3 Roadster #5125. Sold 11/08/2014.
    Build 2: Mk4 Roadster #7750. Sold 04/10/2017. #7750 Build Thread
    Build 3: Mk4 Roadster 20th Anniversary #8674. 03 of 20. 2015 crate Coyote, 2015 IRS. Legal 04/18/2017. #8674 Build Thread
    Build 4: Gen 3 Type 65 Coupe #59. Gen 3 crate Coyote. Delivered 12/2/2017. #59 Coupe Build Thread

  13. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  14. #8
    Senior Member Clover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    197
    Post Thanks / Like
    I use some H-F tools but I tossed my 3/8th H-F torque wrench in the trash after I broke a bolt with it. It was a small aluminum bolt with a rating that was pretty low in the range of the torque wrench. I remember thinking that it seemed like I was putting on more pressure then I thought would be needed but it had not clicked. Then the bolt broke and the tool went in the trash. I felt that it was a bit inconsistent before. Maybe I just got a bad unit but on the lower end of the range, mine did not seem to work at all.

    I got another off of Amazon that had good ratings. I think it was Mountain, but I don't remember and have tossed the case. It seems to work very well for me the past couple of years. What I really want is a Snap-On Digital torque wrench but even used they seem to be around $300. They can do angle and have lights on the side that light up as you get close to your angle or torque rating. Super nice but hard to justify that much for me. Maybe I should look up edwardb's recommendation. Digital is the way to go in my opinion but they used to be very expensive. It looks like now there are some more reasonably priced options available.

  15. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  16. #9
    wareaglescott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Auburn, AL
    Posts
    1,783
    Post Thanks / Like
    I like tools that have lifetime exchange warranties.

    Had a husky I used for the Cobra build. It ended up breaking. I probably owned it for 10 years and got plenty of use out of it. Went up to HD and traded it in for a new one no questions asked. That is always a nice option to have.
    MK4 #8900 - complete kit - Coyote, TKO600, IRS - Delivered 6/28/16 First Start 10/6/16 Go cart - 10/16/16 Build completed - 4/26/17 - 302 days to build my 302 CI Coyote Cobra - Registered and street legal 5/17/17
    Build Thread http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...e-build-thread
    PHIL 4:13 INSTAGRAM - @scottscobra

  17. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  18. #10
    Member FlyingCobra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    79
    Post Thanks / Like
    I've had a couple of H-F torque wrenches (3/8" and 1/2") that I've had for probably 5 years and have used on a number of automotive items. I've never had anything come loose or overtighten and break when using them.

    I wouldn't overthink it.

  19. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  20. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    566
    Post Thanks / Like
    Keep in mind, you will be unable to get a torque wrench on a good amount of bolts. I use a HF, but would recommend buying a quality one

  21. #12
    Papa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Parker, CO
    Posts
    1,289
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have the AC Delco that Paul mentioned. It's great for the low torque bolts like on the Wilwoods. I also have a Craftsman and another off-brand for mid range stuff up to 150 pounds and finally, a Neiko monster 3/4" 39" long beast that can go up to 300 pounds. Believe it or not, the mid range no-name is the one that gets the most use (mostly lug nuts). I don't really like the Craftsman that I bought to replace the no-name piece. Oh, for what it's worth the conversion from ft pounds to inch pounds is simple; one ft pound = 12 inch pounds. So, to do the 150 inch pound Willwood hat bolts, you need 12.5 ft pounds.
    There are 10 types of people in this world;
    those who understand binary and those who don't.

    My Build Thread: http://thefactoryfiveforum.com/showt...ter-Build-9754

  22. Thanks PeteMeindl, rich grsc thanked for this post
  23. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    This one has a good range and is long enough to make 250 ft-lb possible.

    TEKTON 24340 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench (25-250 ft.-lb./33.9-338.9 Nm)

    TEKTON 24340 1/2-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench (25-250 ft.-lb./33.9-338.9 Nm)

  24. Thanks PeteMeindl thanked for this post
  25. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Riverside CT USA
    Posts
    58
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks a lot for all the good advice, guys! I really appreciate it.

    Rear end arrived today so we now have the first actual part of the car!

  26. #15
    Out Drivin' Gumball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Blackberry Township, IL
    Posts
    2,471
    Post Thanks / Like
    I prefer old tools and for torque wrenches I have a couple of older Snap-On ones that are awesome. Smaller 3/8 drive goes to 100 ft. lbs. and larger 1/2" drive to 250 ft. lbs. Nice thing about Snap-On is you can have them calibrated at anytime, as they still support their older stuff.

    Look on-line (craigslist or e-bay are great sources) and find a decent one with a recent certification - you can save a ton of dough and get a really high-quality tool that will last forever.
    Later,
    Chris

    "There are no more monsters to fear, and so, we have to build our own."
    Mk3.1 #7074

  27. #16
    Senior Member BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Raleigh NC USA
    Posts
    655
    Post Thanks / Like
    Agree with NAZ have 4 Craftsmen. 3/8th in in lbs, 3/8 in ft lbs, 1/2 in ft lbs to 120 ft lbs & 1/2 to 300 ft lbs IIRC. Reason for the spread in torque wrenches is accuracy is rated as a % of the scale.

    Mine are basic click on torque. Big thing to remember with these wrenches is to release the setting when you are done to keep calibration. Would not cheap out especially when connecting aluminum parts. Very easy to strip the threads with an over torque.

    Compared to the money you will put into the build good tools are chump change & you will always have the tool afterwards.
    Last edited by BEAR-AvHistory; 08-10-2018 at 12:03 PM.
    Kevin
    MKIV #8234
    Coyote '13/TKO-600
    Delivered 2/7/14 - Plate "COYOTE NC1965" 3/25/15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Flat Irons Tuning

Visit our community sponsor