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Thread: Steering Rack Install/Setup Procedure

  1. #1
    Senior Member karlos's Avatar
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    Steering Rack Install/Setup Procedure

    The FFR build manual is a little short on detail regarding how to properly install and set up the Mk4 steering rack. There is interaction between the rack, the front end alignment, the steering wheel alignment, the steering shaft position, and the number of turns center to full-lock-left and full-lock-right that isn’t immediately obvious. After struggling for a couple weeks to set mine up properly I wanted to write down what I learned in the hopes that it saves someone else some time and trouble. My particular build uses the manual steering rack but the install procedure should be common to both manual and power racks. I acknowledge that there are multiple ways to do this. This is intended to be a somewhat systematic approach that should get all the important parameters in the box.

    The single most important thing to get right is the concept of what is meant by ‘centering the rack’. Note particularly that this does not mean centering the housing of the rack in the chassis, nor does it mean centering the gap between the housing and the rack internals, nor does it mean centering the steering wheel at the midpoint between full-lock-left and full-lock-right. What it refers to is centering the position of the rack’s inner tie rod ends in the suspension. This is best illustrated with a few pictures.

    A properly centered rack will center up the distance to the inner tie rod ends as shown below. Note that you’ll have to slide the boots back in order to measure this. The threaded connection between the inner tie rod ends and the moving part of the rack itself is a convenient place to take a measurement. You’ll also need a reference point on the chassis to which to measure. In the photo below the reference point is the outside wall of the vertical frame member. There are a couple of paint sticks clamped to the frame as a way to extend the surface in order to take a measurement.


    rack_1.JPG

    rack_2.JPG

    rack_3.JPG

    Set up in this manner you’ll notice that there is unequal extension as measured to either side of the rack housing. This is normal (and a reflection of the fact that the rack housing is not perfectly centered in the FFR chassis).


    rack_4.JPG

    rack_5.JPG


    With the rack centered the outer tie rod ends can now be threaded on. You should end up with very close to the same number of threads showing on both sides with the wheels pointed straight ahead. Here’s a convenient way to get the wheels close to straight: tie a string to a spoke on the rear wheel and pass it through the wheel, around the back of the tire, and then extend it to the front wheel as shown. Adjust the outer tie rod ends as required to get the string to just touch the sidewall at the back of the front tire.

    So at this point we have the rack centered, the front wheels are straight with respect to the rear wheels, and we have (mostly) equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends.


    rack_6.JPG


    Unless you’re very lucky, you’ll most likely find that that the steering wheel is now off center (crooked). There are a couple ways to fix this. One way is to remove the steering wheel from the hub it’s attached to, center it up, and then redrill the hole pattern in the hub as required. Another way is to take advantage of the fact that the steering shaft is splined where it attaches to the steering rack. The splines are fairly small and therefore provide for relatively fine adjustment. The problem with this approach is that the shaft on the rack has a flat that is intended to match up with a set screw on the steering column. And most likely the flat and the set screw won’t line up with the shaft rotated as necessary to center the steering wheel. So what you need to do is to mark the location where the set screw ends up and grind a small indentation on the shaft to provide purchase for the set screw. No need to remove a lot of material; the splines resist the torque (not the set screw), so all you need is a small indentation to help the set screw resist the fore/aft motion. I added the indentation shown with the help of a Dremel plus a carbide tungsten bit.


    rack_7.JPG

    rack_8.JPG


    So we now have the rack centered, the front wheels straight with respect to the rear wheels, equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends, and the steering wheel is centered. At this point you can go ahead and set toe-in to specification (typically 1/32” per side, 1/16” total) per any of the techniques described in the FFR FAQ. Finally, we need to verify a roughly equal number of turns on the steering wheel from center to full-lock-left and center to full-lock-right.

    Part of the reason it took me a couple weeks to complete the steering rack install/setup was because I was under the mistaken impression that an equal number of turns both ways was the starting point for the overall installation. This is not the case. In fact, equalizing the number of turns left and right is the final step in the sequence and is accomplished using the specialized set of spacers shown below.


    rack_9.JPG


    Ford “steering travel restrictors” part number N804842-S (about $15 for a package of 4). The rack as supplied by FFR most likely already has travel restrictors installed. On my particular sample, there were actually two of them on each side as shown below. The separately available Ford parts are a split design and can be easily installed with no disassembly of the rack required (other than moving the boot back to expose the innards). Simply install however many spacers are required to even out the travel on both sides. In my case I needed one additional restrictor on the passenger side, at which point I had about 1-1/4 turns from center to full lock on both sides.


    rack_10.JPG


    So at the end of all this we now have the rack centered, toe-in set properly, equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends, a centered steering wheel, and approximately equal travel from center to full-lock-left and full-lock-right. Whew!


    Hope this helps someone else out there save some time and frustration.


    -Karl

  2. #2
    Senior Member DaleG's Avatar
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    Gee Karl, you should have posted this a year ago. Now I understand.
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  4. #3
    Jazzman's Avatar
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    Great post Karl! Thank you!
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    Senior Member KDubU's Avatar
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    Agree, this is an excellent post.
    Kyle

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    Senior Member cgundermann's Avatar
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    Thank you for your time in sharing/very-very valuable info!

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    Senior Member 6t8dart's Avatar
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    Good work! thanks

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    I followed this thread, but stuck in the beginning steps. I centered the wheel lock to lock. My drivers side tie rod end only has about 1/2" of thread. The pass side has over 1". I followed the part about centering the rack, but don't know how to adjust it.

    IMG_7836.jpg
    IMG_7837.jpg

    I have the power rack from FFR.

  9. #8
    BadAsp427's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hjoensy View Post
    I followed this thread, but stuck in the beginning steps. I centered the wheel lock to lock. My drivers side tie rod end only has about 1/2" of thread. The pass side has over 1". I followed the part about centering the rack, but don't know how to adjust it.

    IMG_7836.jpg
    IMG_7837.jpg

    I have the power rack from FFR.
    You do not center by "lock to lock" you must center the rack with measurements and then if needed either add or remove steering stops on the rack ends. I can't tell for sure, but it looks like your photo #1 above shows it has a 1/4-1/2" steering stop on it where as photo 2 doesn't have one. I had one on both sides and had to remove one side to get things to work correctly. If you have the rack centered correctly, then you will have almost exactly the same amount of threads showing on your outer tie rod ends. You may not have the same amount of turning from left to right, this is what is adjusted by the steering stops. Example, after I had centered my rack and completed my alignment, I found that I could turn a very nice tight turn to the right, but not even close to as tight to the left. I found that once I removed my steering stop on the right side, I was then able to turn more to the left and in fact very close if not exactly the same as to the right. Of course yours could be a different fix, but the rack is not mounted center on the FFR roadster so it does take a little adjustment.

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  10. #9
    Senior Member karlos's Avatar
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    You can start with the steering well centered between full lock left and full lock right if you'd like. But centering the steering wheel is not the same as centering the rack. After centering the wheel, equalize the dimensions to the inner tie rod ends as shown above. This is done by simply turning the wheel (there is no adjustment capability at the rack). This of course means that once this step is complete, the steering wheel will no longer be centered. While making sure the rack doesn't move, disconnect the steering shaft at the coupler, rotate the steering wheel until it's pointed straight, and reconnect. If the flat on the rack matches the set screw location on the coupler, you're done. If not, just grind a small flat on the rack shaft to match the set screw location on the coupler and reassemble. That's it.
    Last edited by karlos; 02-03-2019 at 12:44 PM. Reason: clarity
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  12. #10
    Senior Member Big Blocker's Avatar
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    Centering the rack shaft in the rack housing will ensure equal turns lock-to-lock . . . once the position of the rack shaft and the pinion are established (centered), now you can set the inner tie rod ball joints to be centered in relation to the frame - this might mean that you have to mount the rack housing either left or right to get this inner ball joint spec to be correct. Breeze makes a great set of [solid] rack bushings that have off-set center holes for accomplishing this task. If you don't want to run solid bushings, you might need to "clearance" the frame mounting holes a bit in whatever direction you need to move the rack housing.

    Once you have everything set: centered rack housing, centered rack travel, toe-in, that's the time to set the steering wheel to center.

    IF you find that you have tire interference at full lock, go ahead and install steering restriction bushings to limit steering angle.

    Doc
    Last edited by Big Blocker; 02-03-2019 at 01:34 PM.
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  13. #11
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    Excellent post. So, now that I'm going back to center my rack, are there any precautions for removing the clip that holds the boot on. Looks like it's just a spring clamp? Is that a true statement? Reuseable right? Never removed one before, so wanted to ask before I create more issues. Thank you.
    C53FA170-57AA-4195-B4A9-62DC5E4D0CDB.jpeg

    Edit: I have the power steering rack. I just re-read the instructions for installing the power steering rack and there was no mention of centering the rack. An oversight, or not needed for the powersteering rack? Just trying to figure it out.
    Last edited by RJD; 02-05-2019 at 08:16 PM.
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  14. #12
    BadAsp427's Avatar
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    as for the clamps, not sure if those metal ones are reusable.... Mine has large zip ties. I'm certain you could do the same if the metal ones can not be reused. And regardless if it is power or not, centering the rack should be completed.
    Last edited by BadAsp427; 02-06-2019 at 06:10 PM.

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  15. #13
    Senior Member jrcuz's Avatar
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    Like BadAsp427 said use zip ties to replace them. Later on you may need to remove the zip ties if you need to add rack limiters inside the rubber boots.
    JR
    Last edited by jrcuz; 02-06-2019 at 07:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJD View Post
    Excellent post. So, now that I'm going back to center my rack, are there any precautions for removing the clip that holds the boot on. Looks like it's just a spring clamp? Is that a true statement? Reuseable right? Never removed one before, so wanted to ask before I create more issues. Thank you.
    Yes reusable. use a screw driver to widen it out. to reinstall you can use fine needle nosed pliers. i usually us a pair of well worn and not very sharp wire cutters, very gently.
    MK4 #9191, Gen 3 Coyote, T56, 2015+ IRS, ABS, 12.88 Wilwood's, FFR Tubular Front LCA's, FFR Spindles

  17. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrcuz View Post
    Like BadAsp427 said use zip ties to replace them. Later on you may need to remove the zip ties if you need to add rack limiters inside the rubber boots.
    JR
    Quote Originally Posted by dhuff View Post
    Yes reusable. use a screw driver to widen it out. to reinstall you can use fine needle nosed pliers. i usually us a pair of well worn and not very sharp wire cutters, very gently.
    Thanks guys. I'll try to reuse them. If I screw them up, I'll replace them with zip ties. Much obliged.
    MKIV complete kit w/powder coating and cut outs, serial #9189 delivered 10/10/17, first start - 10/5/18, legal - 10/08/20. Blueprint 306 w/Holley Sniper EFI, TKO 600, power steering, Breeze fan shroud, trunk cubby, & engine compartment battery kit, CNC brake reservoirs, RT turn signal & gas pedal, mechanical throttle linkage, METCO safety loop, GASN side pipes, drop trunk, dual chrome roll bars, vintage gauges, glove box, custom center console, cup holders, and speakers.

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    Senior Member FLPBFoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Reynolds View Post
    I used Mark's rack bushings and made the adjustments easy. I like the solid bushings as well. A recommendation from Build School.

    Great product Mark!

    Steve
    2nd MK4 #10639 received 3-19-23. Wife's version. Street Snake - IRS, Willwoods, no roll bars, no hood scoop, no stripes, Blue Print EFI 306 with AOD trans, and under car exhaust. Ford Eruption Green with saddle leather interior.
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    My question isn't related to setup so I apologize. Anyone here have a manual rack? I think it will be fine because the car is light but need some input thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by AutoShippingHUB View Post

    Anyone here have a manual rack? I think it will be fine because the car is light but need some input thanks

    Drove one for several years with manual steering - they aren't too bad except slow moving in a parking lot.

    On the other hand - I eventually decided it wasn't something I was likely going to want to (continue to) wrestle hand over hand in a few years - installed EPAS.


    https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...highlight=epas

  22. #20
    Senior Member MSumners's Avatar
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    Thank you for the detailed explanation , this is clear now. Going to go back through and ensure I have this right.

  23. #21
    TMartinLVNV's Avatar
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    One more thanks for this post. Great instructions that go above and beyond the FFR manual.

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    Question How do I set caster

    Quote Originally Posted by karlos View Post
    The FFR build manual is a little short on detail regarding how to properly install and set up the Mk4 steering rack. There is interaction between the rack, the front end alignment, the steering wheel alignment, the steering shaft position, and the number of turns center to full-lock-left and full-lock-right that isn’t immediately obvious. After struggling for a couple weeks to set mine up properly I wanted to write down what I learned in the hopes that it saves someone else some time and trouble. My particular build uses the manual steering rack but the install procedure should be common to both manual and power racks. I acknowledge that there are multiple ways to do this. This is intended to be a somewhat systematic approach that should get all the important parameters in the box.

    The single most important thing to get right is the concept of what is meant by ‘centering the rack’. Note particularly that this does not mean centering the housing of the rack in the chassis, nor does it mean centering the gap between the housing and the rack internals, nor does it mean centering the steering wheel at the midpoint between full-lock-left and full-lock-right. What it refers to is centering the position of the rack’s inner tie rod ends in the suspension. This is best illustrated with a few pictures.

    A properly centered rack will center up the distance to the inner tie rod ends as shown below. Note that you’ll have to slide the boots back in order to measure this. The threaded connection between the inner tie rod ends and the moving part of the rack itself is a convenient place to take a measurement. You’ll also need a reference point on the chassis to which to measure. In the photo below the reference point is the outside wall of the vertical frame member. There are a couple of paint sticks clamped to the frame as a way to extend the surface in order to take a measurement.


    rack_1.JPG

    rack_2.JPG

    rack_3.JPG

    Set up in this manner you’ll notice that there is unequal extension as measured to either side of the rack housing. This is normal (and a reflection of the fact that the rack housing is not perfectly centered in the FFR chassis).


    rack_4.JPG

    rack_5.JPG


    With the rack centered the outer tie rod ends can now be threaded on. You should end up with very close to the same number of threads showing on both sides with the wheels pointed straight ahead. Here’s a convenient way to get the wheels close to straight: tie a string to a spoke on the rear wheel and pass it through the wheel, around the back of the tire, and then extend it to the front wheel as shown. Adjust the outer tie rod ends as required to get the string to just touch the sidewall at the back of the front tire.

    So at this point we have the rack centered, the front wheels are straight with respect to the rear wheels, and we have (mostly) equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends.


    rack_6.JPG


    Unless you’re very lucky, you’ll most likely find that that the steering wheel is now off center (crooked). There are a couple ways to fix this. One way is to remove the steering wheel from the hub it’s attached to, center it up, and then redrill the hole pattern in the hub as required. Another way is to take advantage of the fact that the steering shaft is splined where it attaches to the steering rack. The splines are fairly small and therefore provide for relatively fine adjustment. The problem with this approach is that the shaft on the rack has a flat that is intended to match up with a set screw on the steering column. And most likely the flat and the set screw won’t line up with the shaft rotated as necessary to center the steering wheel. So what you need to do is to mark the location where the set screw ends up and grind a small indentation on the shaft to provide purchase for the set screw. No need to remove a lot of material; the splines resist the torque (not the set screw), so all you need is a small indentation to help the set screw resist the fore/aft motion. I added the indentation shown with the help of a Dremel plus a carbide tungsten bit.


    rack_7.JPG

    rack_8.JPG


    So we now have the rack centered, the front wheels straight with respect to the rear wheels, equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends, and the steering wheel is centered. At this point you can go ahead and set toe-in to specification (typically 1/32” per side, 1/16” total) per any of the techniques described in the FFR FAQ. Finally, we need to verify a roughly equal number of turns on the steering wheel from center to full-lock-left and center to full-lock-right.

    Part of the reason it took me a couple weeks to complete the steering rack install/setup was because I was under the mistaken impression that an equal number of turns both ways was the starting point for the overall installation. This is not the case. In fact, equalizing the number of turns left and right is the final step in the sequence and is accomplished using the specialized set of spacers shown below.


    rack_9.JPG


    Ford “steering travel restrictors” part number N804842-S (about $15 for a package of 4). The rack as supplied by FFR most likely already has travel restrictors installed. On my particular sample, there were actually two of them on each side as shown below. The separately available Ford parts are a split design and can be easily installed with no disassembly of the rack required (other than moving the boot back to expose the innards). Simply install however many spacers are required to even out the travel on both sides. In my case I needed one additional restrictor on the passenger side, at which point I had about 1-1/4 turns from center to full lock on both sides.


    rack_10.JPG


    So at the end of all this we now have the rack centered, toe-in set properly, equal thread engagement on both outer tie rod ends, a centered steering wheel, and approximately equal travel from center to full-lock-left and full-lock-right. Whew!


    Hope this helps someone else out there save some time and frustration.


    -Karl
    Great article.
    Just spent a day aligning rack, tie rod ends and centering steering wheel.
    Now, after rough camber and toe alignment i can't figure out how to measure or set the camber.
    Any good posts for this?

    Thanks for any help,

    Jeff

  25. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILPBFoot View Post
    I used Mark's rack bushings and made the adjustments easy. I like the solid bushings as well. A recommendation from Build School.

    Great product Mark!

    Steve
    Do the Breeze bushings allow installation of the rack without pulling the boots back?

  26. #24
    Senior Member Big Blocker's Avatar
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    The Breeze solid bushings have nothing to do with the boot positions, they go in the two mounting holes that attach the rack housing to the frame.

    You have to pull the boots back to "see" the outer ends of the rack shaft to inner tie-rod ends to center it to the frame for equal turning radius.

    Doc
    Last edited by Big Blocker; 08-26-2019 at 02:05 PM.
    FFR3712K (MKII) in Lost Wages Nevada.
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  27. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Blocker View Post
    The Breeze solid bushings have nothing to do with the boot positions, they go in the two mounting holes that attach the rack housing to the frame.

    You have to pull the boots back to "see" the outer ends of the rack shaft to inner tie-rod ends to center it to the frame for equal turning radius.

    Doc
    Yep, that makes sense to me. But unless the Breeze bushings help us skip some step or greatly simplify the centering of the rack vs. the process described above the Breeze parts aren't worth the expense. If they allowed for centering the rack without pulling back the boots to peek at the inner tie-rod ends I might be interested in that.

  28. #26
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    With the '04 rack splines are not variable to get the steering wheel rotation closer. I found that you can get fairly close by rotating the hub 180 degrees and then re drilling 2 of the steering wheel holes. See post 34 the the link.

    https://www.ffcars.com/forums/17-fac...191-build.html
    MK4 #9191, Gen 3 Coyote, T56, 2015+ IRS, ABS, 12.88 Wilwood's, FFR Tubular Front LCA's, FFR Spindles

  29. #27
    Senior Member MSumners's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StewPididiot View Post
    Yep, that makes sense to me. But unless the Breeze bushings help us skip some step or greatly simplify the centering of the rack vs. the process described above the Breeze parts aren't worth the expense. If they allowed for centering the rack without pulling back the boots to peek at the inner tie-rod ends I might be interested in that.
    Having just redone the rack centering, the bushings do simplify this process.
    Coupe Kit Delivered 11/10/23

    Roadster Build thread: 2019-2022 https://thefactoryfiveforum.com/show...4-Build-Thread

  30. #28
    Senior Member karlos's Avatar
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    Changed over to power steering last winter and used the Breeze bushings when installing the new power rack. If you're bothered by having to clock the steering wheel to get it pointed straight ahead, or by having to grind a new flat in the rack shaft to accommodate the new position, then the offset bushings may allow you to skip that step. The offset bushings provide for some additional lateral adjustment capability that the standard rubber bushings don't.

    During the installation of my new power rack with the Breeze bushings it was possible to shift the entire rack housing over nearly enough to get it centered. What little remained was then taken up by moving the rack internals. This left the steering wheel clocked at about a 10-degree angle rather than the 90-degree angle shown in the photo above. 10 degrees is a modest amount that can be corrected at the outer tie rods with no ill effects during the alignment process (left/right outer tie rod thread engagement will still be mostly equal).

    Not sure if avoiding a new flat on the rack shaft warrants the $56 cost of the bushings, but I like them and would use them again. Note that either way you'll still need to pull the dust covers back to take your measurements.

    Happy building!

    -Karl
    --
    MKIV Roadster #8641
    Complete Kit with IRS, Eaton Detroit Truetrac, 3.55 gears, Wilwood Brakes
    Ford Racing Z427 w/ Pro-M Sequential Port EFI System
    TKO 600 + McLeod Midshifter; Fast Freddie's Electro-Hydraulic power steering
    Miller Customs Bodywork & Paint

  31. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by karlos View Post
    Changed over to power steering last winter and used the Breeze bushings when installing the new power rack. If you're bothered by having to clock the steering wheel to get it pointed straight ahead, or by having to grind a new flat in the rack shaft to accommodate the new position, then the offset bushings may allow you to skip that step. The offset bushings provide for some additional lateral adjustment capability that the standard rubber bushings don't.

    During the installation of my new power rack with the Breeze bushings it was possible to shift the entire rack housing over nearly enough to get it centered. What little remained was then taken up by moving the rack internals. This left the steering wheel clocked at about a 10-degree angle rather than the 90-degree angle shown in the photo above. 10 degrees is a modest amount that can be corrected at the outer tie rods with no ill effects during the alignment process (left/right outer tie rod thread engagement will still be mostly equal).

    Not sure if avoiding a new flat on the rack shaft warrants the $56 cost of the bushings, but I like them and would use them again. Note that either way you'll still need to pull the dust covers back to take your measurements.

    Happy building!

    -Karl
    I ordered the Breeze bushings last night. Thanks for the advice!

  32. #30
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    Power steering rack-MK4
    How equal should the thread count on the outer tie rod ends be?

    With the rack centered and equal threads on each outer tie rod, my passenger side is very short. Memory serves right 3/4 an inch off.

  33. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smarstiller View Post
    Power steering rack-MK4
    How equal should the thread count on the outer tie rod ends be?

    With the rack centered and equal threads on each outer tie rod, my passenger side is very short. Memory serves right 3/4 an inch off.

    If "the rack" was centered, your passenger side would not be short - the driver + passenger side would be equal.

    I suspect that you concentrated on centering "the rack" in the "the rack housing" - the rack housing does not matter - the rack housing is never going to be "center" because the steering shaft has to locate pretty much "right where it is".

    Center "the rack" (the moving part).

  34. #32
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    Just went through this process, many thanks!

  35. #33
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    I have a base kit and am using a Mustang PS rack, with the extensions added. Are travel limiters required to keep the tires from rubbing the inner fenders?

    Also, is the difference in angles between the two tires at full lock significant? I haven't measured the angles, but the delta between the two seems too large.

    Thanks, in advance for any advice.

  36. #34
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    The wheels will have different angles at all turning positions - this is needed because they're going around differently-sized circles as you turn. At full lock, it is a very obvious difference in angle. Look up Ackerman angle for more info.
    Mk4 #8861 Complete kit. Delivered: 27 Apr 2016, currently a roller.
    Gen-2 Coyote, clutch, TKO600, midshift, and solid axle from Forte. Many pieces from Breeze and Replicarparts.

  37. #35
    25th Anniversary #9772 toadster's Avatar
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    how do i remove these clamps on the boot?

    Todd
    25th Anniversary MkIV | #20 of 25 | Build #9772
    https://cobradreams.com/ <- my build!

  38. #36
    JohnK's Avatar
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    I just used a screwdriver to pry up the end and unlock it off the tab. They're not reusable. I used a heavy duty plastic zip tie to put the boot back on but I'm sure you could find a replacement boot clamp at any auto parts store.
    MkIV Roadster build: Gen 2 Coyote, IRS, TKO600. Ordered 10/24/18. Delivered 1/29/19. Engine installed 8/8/21. First start 9/12/21. First go-kart 9/17/21. Off to paint 4/11/22. Back from paint 12/30/22. Build thread here.

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  40. #37
    Senior Member nucjd19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK View Post
    I just used a screwdriver to pry up the end and unlock it off the tab. They're not reusable. I used a heavy duty plastic zip tie to put the boot back on but I'm sure you could find a replacement boot clamp at any auto parts store.
    Agree. I did go on Amazon and picked up a crimping tool for these types of clamps and recrimped mine after setting the c clips for stops on mine
    FFR MK4 Roadster (9945) complete kit, delivered 12/4/2020, First start and go kart 5/7/2021. Legal 8/14/2021, Paint finished 7/18/2022 (Viking Blue). 347BPE CI, TKO600, Moser 8.8 3link 3.55, Halibrand 17x9 17x10.5, power steering. Carbon Fiber Dash. Carbon Fiber trans tunnel, adjustable Kirkey Lowback Vintage seats, Vintage gauges, RT drop trunk mod, FFmetal drop battery mod and trans tunnel, Forte front sway bar. Forte mechanical throttle linkage, RT gas pedal. www.covespringsfarm.com

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  42. #38
    Senior Member CraigS's Avatar
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    W/ a bit of patience you can re tighten them w/ a pair of cutters. If you have an old pair that don't cut well anymore they will be perfect.
    https://www.amazon.com/iExcell-Diago...13300696&psc=1
    A vice grip can come in handy also. If you enjoy an opportunity to buy another tool, end cutting pliers may have more other uses in the future.
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-7-...8060/203287749
    FFR MkII, 408W, Tremec TKO 500, 2015 IRS, DA QA1s, Forte front bar, APE hardtop.

  43. #39
    JohnK's Avatar
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    These band clamps are just really large Oetiker (pinch clamps). I bought this tool, which has jaws on the top and the side, which comes in handy in tight spaces. Pinch clamps are a nice clean, reliable solution on hoses that you don't need to disassemble regularly. So much nicer than having worm gear clamps on all the small hoses. This is a worthwhile addition to the toolkit, beyond just the steering rack clamps.

    https://www.amazon.com/Knipex-Tools-...45&sr=8-3&th=1
    MkIV Roadster build: Gen 2 Coyote, IRS, TKO600. Ordered 10/24/18. Delivered 1/29/19. Engine installed 8/8/21. First start 9/12/21. First go-kart 9/17/21. Off to paint 4/11/22. Back from paint 12/30/22. Build thread here.

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  45. #40
    25th Anniversary #9772 toadster's Avatar
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    I assume you all did this recommendation first? was it that far off from this basic setup?



    btw - I also have the Breeze offset rack kit

    https://breezeautomotive.com/shop/of...ter-and-coupe/
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    Last edited by toadster; 10-06-2023 at 01:22 PM.
    Todd
    25th Anniversary MkIV | #20 of 25 | Build #9772
    https://cobradreams.com/ <- my build!

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